How to buy proventil online cheaply!

What is Proventil?

Proventil (albuterol) is a bronchodilator that relaxes muscles in the airways and increases air flow to the lungs.

Proventil HFA is used to treat or prevent bronchospasm in people with reversible obstructive airway disease. Proventil is also used to prevent exercise-induced bronchospasm.

Proventil may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Proventil

It is important to keep Proventil on hand at all times. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely. Keep using all of your other medications as prescribed by your doctor.

Talk with your doctor if any of your asthma medications do not seem to work as well in treating or preventing attacks. If it seems like you need to use more of any of your medications in a 24-hour period, talk with your doctor. An increased need for Proventil could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of albuterol can be fatal. Extreme heat can cause the Proventil HFA canister to burst. Do not store your inhaler in your car on hot days. Do not throw an empty canister into open flame.
Before using Proventil

You should not use Proventil if you are allergic to albuterol.

To make sure you can safely use Proventil, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

*

  heart disease, high blood pressure, or congestive heart failure;
*

  a heart rhythm disorder;
*

  a seizure disorder such as epilepsy;
*

  diabetes; or
*

  overactive thyroid.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Proventil will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether albuterol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using Proventil. An inhaler should not be given to a child younger than 4 years old.

See also: Proventil pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I use Proventil?

Use Proventil exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Use only the prescribed dose of this medicine and follow all patient instructions for safe use. Talk with your doctor about your individual risks and benefits of using Proventil.

When using the Proventil inhaler device for the first time, prime it by spraying 4 test sprays into the air, away from your face. Shake well before priming. Also prime the inhaler if you have not used it for 2 weeks or longer, or if you have dropped the inhaler.

The instructions below are for standard use of the inhaler. Your doctor may want you to use your device differently. Use only the inhaler device provided with your medicine or you may not get the correct dose.

To use the Proventil inhaler:

* Shake the canister well just before each spray.
*

  Uncap the mouthpiece of the Proventil inhaler. Breathe out fully. Put the mouthpiece into your mouth and close your lips. Breathe in slowly while pushing down on the canister. Hold your breath for 10 seconds, then breathe out slowly.
*

  If you use more than one inhalation at a time, wait at least 1 minute before using the second inhalation and shake the inhaler again.
*

  Keep your Proventil inhaler clean and dry, and store it with the cap on the mouthpiece. Clean your inhaler once a week by removing the canister and placing the mouthpiece under warm running water for at least 30 seconds. Shake out the excess water and allow the parts to air dry completely before putting the inhaler back together.

Talk with your doctor if any of your asthma medications do not seem to work as well in treating or preventing attacks. If it seems like you need to use more of any of your medications in a 24-hour period, talk with your doctor.

An increased need for Proventil could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.

It is important to keep Proventil on hand at all times. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely. Keep using all of your other medications as prescribed by your doctor.

Store Proventil HFA at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Extreme heat can cause the medicine canister to burst. Do not store it in your car on hot days. Do not throw an empty canister into open flame.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of Proventil can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include nervousness, headache, tremor, dry mouth, chest pain or heavy feeling, rapid or uneven heart rate, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, dizziness, seizure (convulsions), feeling light-headed or fainting.
What should I avoid while using Proventil?

Avoid getting this medication in your eyes. If this does happen, rinse the eyes with water and seek medical attention.
Proventil side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Proventil: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

*

  bronchospasm (wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing), especially after starting a new canister of this medicine;
*

  chest pain and fast, pounding, or uneven heart beats;
*

  tremor, nervousness;
*

  low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling); or
*

  dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure).

Less serious Proventil side effects may include:

*

  headache, dizziness;
*

  sleep problems (insomnia);
*

  cough, hoarseness, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose;
*

  mild nausea, vomiting;
*

  dry mouth and throat;
*

  muscle pain; or
*

  diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Proventil side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Proventil?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

*

  a diuretic (water pill);
*

  digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);
*

  a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Dutoprol, Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), nebivolol (Bystolic), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others;
*

  an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip, Limbitrol), doxepin (Sinequan, Silenor), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and others;
*

  an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate); or
*

  other bronchodilators such as levalbuterol (Xopenex), pirbuterol (Maxair), terbutaline (Brethine, Bricanyl), salmeterol (Advair, Serevent), metaproterenol (Alupent, Metaprel), or isoproterenol (Isuprel Mistometer).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Proventil. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy protonix online cheaply!

What is Protonix?

Protonix is in a group of drugs called proton pump inhibitors. It decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Protonix is used to treat erosive esophagitis (damage to the esophagus from stomach acid), and other conditions involving excess stomach acid such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Protonix is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Protonix may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Protonix

You should not use Protonix if you are allergic to pantoprazole or to any other benzimidazole medication such as albendazole (Albenza), or mebendazole (Vermox). Protonix is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms. Take Protonix for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the condition is fully treated. Protonix should not be taken together with atazanavir (Reyataz) or nelfinavir (Viracept). Tell your doctor if you are taking either of these medications to treat HIV or AIDS.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Some conditions must be treated long-term with Protonix. The chronic use of Protonix has caused stomach cancer in animal studies, but it is not known if this medication would have the same effects in humans. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of developing stomach cancer.

Long-term treatment with Protonix may also make it harder for your body to absorb vitamin B-12, resulting in a deficiency of this vitamin. Talk with your doctor if you need long-term Protonix treatment and you have concerns about vitamin B-12 deficiency.
Before taking Protonix

You should not take Protonix if you are allergic to pantoprazole or to any other benzimidazole medication such as albendazole (Albenza), or mebendazole (Vermox).

To make sure you can safely take Protonix, tell your doctor if you low levels of magnesium in your blood.

Some conditions must be treated long-term with Protonix. The chronic use of pantoprazole has caused stomach cancer in animal studies, but it is not known if Protonix would have the same effects in humans. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of developing stomach cancer.

Taking a proton pump inhibitor such as Protonix may increase your risk of bone fracture in the hip, wrist, or spine. This effect has occurred mostly in people who have taken the medication long term or at high doses, and in those who are age 50 and older. It is not clear whether Protonix is the actual cause of an increased risk of fracture. Before you take this medication, tell your doctor if you have osteoporosis or osteopenia (low bone mineral density).

Long-term treatment with Protonix may also make it harder for your body to absorb vitamin B-12, resulting in a deficiency of this vitamin. Symptoms of a vitamin B-12 deficiency may develop slowly and include pale skin, weakness, tired feeling, shortness of breath, and a fast heart rate. Talk with your doctor if you need long-term Protonix treatment and you have concerns about vitamin B-12 deficiency.

FDA pregnancy category B. Protonix is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Pantoprazole can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use Protonix without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

See also: Protonix pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Protonix?

Take Protonix exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Protonix tablets can be taken with or without food. Protonix oral granules should be taken 30 minutes before a meal.

Do not crush, chew, or break the tablet. Swallow it whole. The enteric-coated pill has a special coating to protect your stomach. Breaking the pill will damage this coating.

The oral granules should be mixed only with applesauce or apple juice to make swallowing easy. Do not use any other type of liquid or soft food. Sprinkle the granules directly onto a teaspoon of applesauce and swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Or pour the granules into a cup with 1 teaspoon of apple juice, stir for 5 seconds and swallow right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more apple juice to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away. Do not save the granule mixture for later use.

To give Protonix granules through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube:

*

  Attach a 60-milliliter syringe to the NG tube and remove the plunger. Hold the syringe high enough to prevent any bends in the tube.
*

  Sprinkle the Protonix granules into the syringe barrel and mix in 2 teaspoons of apple juice. Gently tap or shake the syringe as it empties into the tube.
*

  Add another 2 teaspoons of apple juice to the syringe to help rinse the granules through and to make sure the entire Protonix dose is given. Tap or shake the syringe as the juice empties into the tube.
*

  Repeat the rinse with 2 teaspoons of apple juice at least twice more, gently shaking the syringe as it empties into the tube. Make sure there are no granules remaining in the syringe or NG tube.

Protonix can cause you to have a false positive drug-screening test. If you provide a urine sample for drug-screening, tell the laboratory staff that you are taking Protonix.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the condition is fully treated. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking Protonix.

Store Protonix at room temperature away from moisture and heat.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.
What should I avoid while taking Protonix?

This medication can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking Protonix and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Follow your doctor’s instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.
Protonix side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Protonix: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using Protonix and call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of low magnesium such as:

*

  fast or uneven heart rate;
*

  jerking muscle movements;
*

  feeling jittery;
*

  diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
*

  muscle cramps, muscle weakness or limp feeling;
*

  cough or choking feeling; or
*

  headache, trouble concentrating, memory problems, weakness, loss of appetite, feeling unsteady, confusion, hallucinations, fainting, seizure, or shallow breathing

Less serious Protonix side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

*

  weight changes;
*

  nausea, vomiting, mild diarrhea;
*

  gas, stomach pain;
*

  dizziness, drowsiness, tired feeling;
*

  joint pain; or
*

  sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Protonix side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Protonix?

Protonix should not be taken together with atazanavir (Reyataz) or nelfinavir (Viracept). Tell your doctor if you are taking either of these medications to treat HIV or AIDS.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

*

  ampicillin (Principen, Unasyn);
*

  a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);
*

  digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);
*

  a diuretic (water pill);
*

  ketoconazole (Nizoral);
*

  iron (Feosol, Mol-Iron, Fergon, Femiron, others); or
*

  methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Protonix. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy propranolol online cheaply!

What is propranolol?

Propranolol is a beta-blocker. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

Propranolol is used to treat tremors, angina (chest pain), hypertension (high blood pressure), heart rhythm disorders, and other heart or circulatory conditions. It is also used to treat or prevent heart attack, and to reduce the severity and frequency of migraine headaches.

Propranolol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about propranolol?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to propranolol, if you have asthma, a slow heart rate, or a serious heart condition such as “sick sinus syndrome” or “AV block” (unless you have a pacemaker).

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using propranolol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.
Video: Treatment for Depression
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Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Do not skip doses or stop using propranolol without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your blood levels of propranolol.

Propranolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking propranolol?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to propranolol, if you have asthma, a slow heart rate, or a serious heart condition such as “sick sinus syndrome” or “AV block” (unless you have a pacemaker).

To make sure you can safely take propranolol, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

a muscle disorder;

bronchitis, emphysema, or other breathing disorders;

diabetes (propranolol can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar);

low blood pressure;

congestive heart failure;

depression;

liver or kidney disease;

a thyroid disorder;

pheochromocytoma; or

problems with circulation (such as Raynaud's syndrome).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether propranolol will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

Propranolol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
How should I take propranolol?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

You may take propranolol with or without food, but take it the same way each time.

Take the medicine at the same time each day.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release capsule. Swallow it whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Do not skip doses or stop using propranolol without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using propranolol. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Propranolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using propranolol.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Propranolol dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

For regular (short-acting) propranolol: Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if your next dose is less than 4 hours away.

For extended-release propranolol (Inderal LA, InnoPran XL and others): Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if your next dose is less than 8 hours away.

Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include slow or uneven heartbeats, dizziness, weakness, or fainting.
What should I avoid while taking propranolol?

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your blood levels of propranolol.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.
Propranolol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fast, slow, or uneven heartbeats;

feeling light-headed, fainting;

feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

swelling of your ankles or feet;

nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

cold feeling in your hands and feet;

depression, confusion, hallucinations; or

severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, stomach cramps;

decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm;

sleep problems (insomnia); or

tired feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: propranolol side effects (in more detail)
Propranolol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally twice a day or 80 mg sustained release once a day, whether used alone or added to a diuretic. The dose should be administered at bedtime (approximately 10 PM).
Maintenance dose: 120 to 240 mg/day or 120 to 160 mg/day of sustained release
Maximum dose: 640 mg/day.

Usual Adult Dose for Angina Pectoris:

Total daily doses of 80 to 320 mg orally 2 to 4 times a day have been shown to increase exercise tolerance and to reduce ischemic changes in the ECG.
Sustained release: Initial dose: 80 mg orally once a day. Dosage should be gradually increased at 3 to 7 day intervals. The average optimal dosage appears to be 160 mg/day.

Usual Adult Dose for Arrhythmias:

Oral: 10 to 30 mg 3 to 4 times a day, before meals and at bedtime.
IV: 1 to 3 mg at a rate not exceeding 1 mg/min.
Sufficient time should be allowed for the drug to reach the site of action even when a slow circulation is present. A second dose may be given after 2 minutes. Thereafter, additional drug should not be given in less than 4 hours. Additional propranolol should not be given when the desired alteration in rate and/or rhythm is achieved.

Usual Adult Dose for Myocardial Infarction:

180 to 240 mg/day in 3 to 4 divided doses.

Usual Adult Dose for Migraine Prophylaxis:

Initial dose: 80 mg/day orally in divided doses.
Maintenance dose: 160 to 240 mg/day.
The dosage may be increased gradually to achieve optimum migraine prophylaxis. If a satisfactory response is not obtained within 4 to 6 weeks after reaching the maximum dose, propranolol therapy should be discontinued.
Sustained release: Initial dose: 80 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 160 to 240 mg once a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Benign Essential Tremor:

Initial dose: 40 mg orally twice a day.
Maintenance dose: 120 to 320 mg/day.
Optimum reduction of essential tremor is usually achieved with a dose of 120 mg/day.
Occasionally, it may be necessary to administer 240 to 320 mg/day.

Usual Adult Dose for Aortic Stenosis:

20 to 40 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day, before meals and at bedtime.
Sustained release: 80 to 160 mg orally once a day.

Usual Adult Dose for Pheochromocytoma:

Preoperatively: 60 mg/day orally in divided doses for 3 days prior to surgery, concomitantly with an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent.
Management of Inoperable Tumor: 30 mg/day orally in divided doses.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Arrhythmias:

Oral: Children: Initial: 0.5 to 1 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 6 to 8 hours; titrate dosage upward every 3 to 5 days; usual dose: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day; higher doses may be needed; do not exceed 16 mg/kg/day

IV: Children: 0.01 to 0.1 mg/kg slow IV over 10 minutes; maximum dose: 1 mg (infants); 3 mg (children).

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hypertension:

Children:
Immediate release formulations:
Initial: 0.5 to 1 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 6 to 12 hours; increase gradually every 5 to 7 days
Usual dose: 1 to 5 mg/kg/day
Maximum dose: 8 mg/kg/day

Children and Adolescents 1 to 17 years:
Immediate release formulations:
Initial: 1 to 2 mg/kg/day divided in 2 to 3 doses/day; titrate dose to effect
Maximum dose: 4 mg/kg/day up to 640 mg/day; sustained release formulation may be dosed once daily. (National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents).

Usual Pediatric Dose for Thyrotoxicosis:

Neonates: Oral: 2 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 6 to 12 hours; occasionally higher doses may be required.

Adolescents: Oral: 10 to 40 mg/dose every 6 hours.
What other drugs will affect propranolol?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

cimetidine (Tagamet);

clonidine (Catapres);

digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin);

dobutamine (Dobutrex);

haloperidol (Haldol);

isoproterenol (Isuprel);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip, Limbitrol), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others;

an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);

aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others;

doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), terazosin (Hytrin);

heart or blood pressure medicine such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta, Amturnide), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others;

amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quin-G); or

an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with propranolol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy proscar online cheaply!

What is Proscar?

Proscar prevents the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the body. DHT is involved in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

Proscar is used to treat symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in men with an enlarged prostate.

Proscar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Proscar

Proscar should never be taken by a woman or a child. Finasteride can be absorbed through the skin, and women or children should not be permitted to handle Proscar tablets.

Although Proscar is not for use by women, this medication can cause birth defects if a woman is exposed to it during pregnancy. Proscar tablets should not be handled by a woman who is pregnant or who may become pregnant. If a woman accidentally comes into contact with this medication from a broken or crushed tablet, wash the area with soap and water right away.

Before taking Proscar, tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to finasteride, or to a similar medicine called dutasteride (Avodart).

Using Proscar may increase your risk of developing prostate cancer. Your doctor will perform tests to make sure you do not have other conditions that would prevent you from safely using Proscar.

Call your doctor at once if you notice any breast lumps, pain, nipple discharge, or other breast changes. These may be signs of male breast cancer.
Before taking Proscar

Proscar should never be taken by a woman or a child. Finasteride can be absorbed through the skin, and women or children should not be permitted to handle Proscar tablets.

To make sure you can safely take Proscar, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

*

  liver disease, or abnormal liver enzyme tests;
*

  prostate cancer;
*

  a bladder muscle disorder;
*

  stricture of your urethra;
*

  if you are unable to urinate; or/p>
*

  if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a similar medicine called dutasteride (Avodart).

Using Proscar may increase your risk of developing prostate cancer. Your doctor will perform tests to make sure you do not have other conditions that would prevent you from safely using finasteride.

Although Proscar is not for use by women, this medication can cause birth defects if a woman is exposed to it during pregnancy. Proscar tablets should not be handled by a woman who is pregnant or who may become pregnant. If a woman accidentally comes into contact with this medication from a broken or crushed tablet, wash the area with soap and water right away.
How should I take Proscar?

Take Proscar exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Proscar can be taken with or without food. Take the medicine at the same time each day.

To be sure Proscar is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested often. Your doctor will also test your prostate specific antigen (PSA) to check for prostate cancer. Visit your doctor regularly.

Use Proscar regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store Proscar at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.
What should I avoid while taking Proscar?

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.
Proscar side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Proscar: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you notice any breast lumps, pain, nipple discharge, or other breast changes. These may be signs of male breast cancer.

Less serious Proscar side effects may include:

*

  impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm;
*

  abnormal ejaculation;
*

  swelling in your hands or feet;
*

  swelling or tenderness in your breasts;
*

  dizziness, weakness;
*

  feeling like you might pass out;
*

  headache;
*

  runny nose; or
*

  skin rash.

The sexual side effects of Proscar (decreased libido, trouble having an erection, ejaculation problems) may continue after you stop taking this medication. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about these side effects.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Proscar side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Proscar?

There may be other drugs that can interact with Proscar Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy propecia online cheaply!

What is Propecia?

Propecia prevents the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the body.

Propecia is used for the treatment of male pattern hair loss on the vertex and the anterior mid-scalp area. Male pattern hair loss is a common condition in which men experience thinning of the hair on the scalp. Often, this results in a receding hairline and/or balding on the top of the head. Propecia is for use by men only and should not be used by women or children.

Propecia may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Propecia

Propecia should never be taken by a woman or a child. Finasteride can be absorbed through the skin, and women or children should not be permitted to handle Propecia tablets.

Although Propecia is not for use by women, this medication can cause birth defects if a woman is exposed to it during pregnancy. Propecia tablets should not be handled by a woman who is pregnant or who may become pregnant. Propecia tablets are coated and will prevent contact with the active ingredient during normal handling, provided that the tablets are not broken or crushed. If a woman accidentally comes into contact with this medication from a broken or crushed tablet, wash the area with soap and water right away.

Before taking Propecia, tell your doctor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to finasteride, or to a similar medicine called dutasteride Avodart).

Using Propecia may increase your risk of developing prostate cancer. Your doctor will perform tests to make sure you do not have other conditions that would prevent you from safely using Propecia.

Call your doctor at once if you notice any breast lumps, pain, nipple discharge, or other breast changes. These may be signs of male breast cancer.
Before taking Propecia

Propecia should never be taken by a woman or a child. Finasteride can be absorbed through the skin, and women or children should not be permitted to handle finasteride tablets,

To make sure you can safely take Propecia, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

*

  liver disease, or abnormal liver enzyme tests;
*

  prostate cancer;
*

  a bladder muscle disorder;
*

  stricture of your urethra;
*

  if you are unable to urinate; or
*

  if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a similar medicine called dutasteride (Avodart).

Using Propecia may increase your risk of developing prostate cancer. Your doctor will perform tests to make sure you do not have other conditions that would prevent you from safely using finasteride.

Although Propecia is not for use by women, this medication can cause birth defects if a woman is exposed to it during pregnancy. Propecia tablets should not be handled by a woman who is pregnant or who may become pregnant. Propecia tablets are coated and will prevent contact with the active ingredient during normal handling, provided that the tablets are not broken or crushed. If a woman accidentally comes into contact with this medication from a broken or crushed tablet, wash the area with soap and water right away.
How should I take Propecia?

Take Propecia exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Propecia can be taken with or without food. Take the medicine at the same time each day.

It is important to use Propecia regularly to get the most benefit. You may need to take Propecia daily for three months or more before you see a benefit. Propecia can only work over the long term if you continue taking it. If the drug has not worked for you in twelve months, further treatment is unlikely to be of benefit. If you stop taking Propecia, you will likely lose the hair you have gained within 12 months of stopping treatment. You should discuss this with your doctor.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested often. Your doctor will also test your prostate specific antigen (PSA) to check for prostate cancer. Visit your doctor regularly.

Store Propecia at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

See also: Propecia dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of Propecia is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.
What should I avoid while taking Propecia?

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.
Propecia side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you notice any breast lumps, pain, nipple discharge, or other breast changes. These may be signs of male breast cancer.

Less serious Propecia side effects may include:

*

  impotence, loss of interest in sex, or trouble having an orgasm;
*

  abnormal ejaculation;
*

  swelling in your hands or feet;
*

  swelling or tenderness in your breasts;
*

  dizziness, weakness;
*

  feeling like you might pass out;
*

  headache;
*

  runny nose; or
*

  skin rash.

The sexual side effects of Propecia (decreased libido, trouble having an erection, ejaculation problems) may continue after you stop taking this medication. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about these side effects.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Propecia side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Propecia?

There may be other drugs that can interact with Propecia. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy prometrium online cheaply!

What is Prometrium (progesterone)?

Progesterone is a female hormone important for the regulation of ovulation and menstruation.

Progesterone is used to cause menstrual periods in women who have not yet reached menopause but are not having periods due to a lack of progesterone in the body. Progesterone is also used to prevent overgrowth in the lining of the uterus in postmenopausal women who are receiving estrogen hormone replacement therapy.

Progesterone should not be used to prevent heart disease or dementia, because this medication may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions.

Progesterone may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about Prometrium (progesterone)?

Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant. It could cause harm to the unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

Some forms of this medication may contain peanut oil. Do not use progesterone without telling your doctor if you have a peanut allergy.

Using progesterone can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, heart attack, or breast cancer.

Do not use this medication if you have any of the following conditions: a history of breast cancer, abnormal vaginal bleeding, liver disease, if you are pregnant, or if you have had a stroke, heart attack, or blood clot within the past year.

Progesterone is sometimes given for only a short period of time, such as 6 to 12 days at a time during each menstrual cycle. Following your dosing schedule is very important for this medication to be effective. Try not to miss any doses.

Progesterone may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Progesterone should not be used to prevent heart disease or dementia, because this medication may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Prometrium (progesterone)?

Some forms of this medication may contain peanut oil. Do not use progesterone without telling your doctor if you have a peanut allergy.

Do not use progesterone if you have:

a history of breast cancer;

abnormal vaginal bleeding that a doctor has not checked;

liver disease;

if you are pregnant; or

if you have had a stroke, heart attack, or blood clot within the past year.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use progesterone:

heart disease, circulation problems;

risk factors for coronary artery disease (such as smoking, being overweight, and having high blood pressure or high cholesterol);

migraines,

asthma;

kidney disease;

seizures or epilepsy;

a history of depression; or

diabetes.

Do not use progesterone without your doctor’s consent if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication.

Progesterone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
How should I use Prometrium (progesterone)?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Progesterone is sometimes given for only a short period of time, such as 6 to 12 days at a time during each menstrual cycle. Following your dosing schedule is very important for this medication to be effective. Try not to miss any doses.

This medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Take the pill form of progesterone with a full glass of water.

Apply progesterone cream to the skin as directed by your doctor.

Progesterone injection is given as a shot into a muscle. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection. You may be given instructions on how to use your injections at home. Do not use this medicine at home if you do not fully understand how to give the injection and properly dispose of needles and syringes used in giving the medicine.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using progesterone.

Your doctor will need to see you on a regular basis while you are using this medication. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Store progesterone at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Call your doctor if you miss more than one dose of this medication.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.
What should I avoid while using Prometrium (progesterone)?

Progesterone may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.
Prometrium (progesterone) side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden headache, confusion, pain behind the eyes, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

fast or pounding heartbeats;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

unusual or unexpected vaginal bleeding;

migraine headache;

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

a breast lump; or

symptoms of depression (sleep problems, weakness, mood changes).

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, diarrhea, bloating, stomach cramps;

dizziness, spinning sensation;

hot flashes;

mild headache;

joint pain;

breast pain or tenderness;

cough;

acne or increased hair growth;

changes in weight; or

vaginal itching, dryness, or discharge.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Prometrium side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Prometrium (progesterone)?

There may be other drugs that can interact with progesterone. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy procardia online cheaply!

What is Procardia (nifedipine)?

Nifedipine is in a group of drugs called calcium channel blockers. It works by relaxing the muscles of your heart and blood vessels.

Nifedipine is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) and angina (chest pain).

Nifedipine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about Procardia (nifedipine)?

You should not use nifedipine if you are allergic to it.

Before taking nifedipine, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, a blockage in your digestive tract (stomach or intestines), a history of stomach surgery, coronary artery disease, underactive thyroid, diabetes, or congestive heart failure.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nifedipine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Many drugs can interact with nifedipine. Tell your doctor about all other medications you use.

Do not stop taking nifedipine without first talking to your doctor, even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Procardia (nifedipine)?

You should not use nifedipine if you are allergic to it.

To make sure you can safely take nifedipine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney disease;

liver disease (especially cirrhosis);

diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic constipation;

gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or slow digestion;

a blockage in your digestive tract (stomach or intestines);

a colostomy or history of stomach surgery such as gastric bypass;

colon cancer;

underactive thyroid;

diabetes;

coronary artery disease; or

congestive heart failure.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether nifedipine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication..

Nifedipine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

The nifedipine extended-release tablet may contain lactose. Talk to your doctor before using this form of nifedipine if you have galactose intolerance, or severe problems with lactose (milk sugar).
How should I take Procardia (nifedipine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Take the Adalat CC tablet on an empty stomach.

Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Some tablet forms of nifedipine are made with a shell that is not absorbed or melted in the body. Part of the tablet shell may appear in your stool. This is a normal side effect of nifedipine and will not make the medication less effective.

Call your doctor if you have ongoing vomiting or diarrhea, or if you are sweating more than usual. These conditions can lead to severely low blood pressure.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using nifedipine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Do not stop taking nifedipine without first talking to your doctor, even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

If you are also taking a beta-blocker (such as Betapace, Coreg, Corgard, Dutoprol, Inderal, InnoPran, Lopressor, Normodyne, Tenormin, Tenoretic, Toprol, Trandate, and others), do not suddenly stop using the beta blocker without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. Stopping a beta blocker too quickly can cause serious heart problems that will not be prevented by nifedipine.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often and you may need other blood tests at your doctor’s office. Visit your doctor regularly.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include severe dizziness, pounding heartbeats, nausea, vomiting, and feeling like you might pass out.
What should I avoid while taking Procardia (nifedipine)?

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with nifedipine and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can lower your blood pressure further and may increase certain side effects of nifedipine.
Procardia (nifedipine) side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

worsening angina;

severe constipation and cramps, severe stomach pain or heartburn, coughing up blood;

feeling like you might pass out;

feeling short of breath, swelling in your hands or feet;

fast or pounding heartbeats;

numbness or tingly feeling;

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache, dizziness;

drowsiness, tired feeling;

nausea, diarrhea mild constipation or stomach pain;

sleep problems (insomnia);

mild rash or itching;

joint pain, leg cramps;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin; or

urinating more than usual.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Procardia side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Procardia (nifedipine)?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

cimetidine (Tagamet);

conivaptan (Vaprisol);

digoxin (Lanoxin);

fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora) or other narcotic pain medications;

imatinib (Gleevec);

isoniazid (for treating tuberculosis);

laxatives;

levothyroxine (Synthroid and others);

nefazodone;

St. John's wort;

tizanidine (Zanaflex);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

cold or allergy medicine;

an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, Pediazole), or telithromycin (Ketek);

antifungal medication such as itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), miconazole (Oravig), or voriconazole (Vfend);

a beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin, Tenoretic), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), timolol (Blocadren), and others;

heart or blood pressure medication such as nicardipine (Cardene) or quinidine (Quin-G);

HIV/AIDS medicine such as atazanavir (Reyataz), delavirdine (Rescriptor), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), saquinavir (Invirase), or ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra); or

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with nifedipine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy prilosec online cheaply!

What is Prilosec?

Prilosec (omeprazole) belongs to a group of drugs called proton pump inhibitors. Omeprazole decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Prilosec is used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions caused by excess stomach acid. It is also used to promote healing of erosive esophagitis (damage to your esophagus caused by stomach acid).

Prilosec may also be given together with antibiotics to treat gastric ulcer caused by infection with helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).

Prilosec is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Prilosec may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Prilosec

Prilosec is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of Prilosec and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

You should not take Prilosec if you are allergic to omeprazole or to any other benzimidazole medication such as albendazole (Albenza), or mebendazole (Vermox).

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take Prilosec if you have liver disease or heart disease, or low levels of magnesium in your blood.

Prilosec OTC (over-the-counter) should be taken only once every 24 hours for 14 days. It may take up to 4 days for full effect. Do not take more than one tablet every 24 hours.

Allow at least 4 months to pass before you start another 14-day treatment with Prilosec OTC. Call your doctor if you have additional symptoms and need treatment before the 4 months has passed.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take Prilosec if you have liver disease or heart disease. You may need a dose adjustment or special tests.
Before taking Prilosec

You should not take Prilosec if you are allergic to omeprazole or to any other benzimidazole medication such as albendazole (Albenza), or mebendazole (Vermox).

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take Prilosec if you have liver disease or heart disease, or low levels of magnesium in your blood.

Do not use over-the-counter omeprazole (Prilosec OTC) without the advice of a doctor if you have:

*

  trouble or pain with swallowing;
*

  bloody or black stools;
*

  vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds;
*

  heartburn that has lasted for over 3 months;
*

  frequent chest pain;
*

  heartburn with wheezing;
*

  unexplained weight loss;
*

  nausea or vomiting; or
*

  stomach pain.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of Prilosec and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Taking a proton pump inhibitor such as Prilosec may increase your risk of bone fracture in the hip, wrist, or spine. This effect has occurred mostly in people who have taken the medication long term or at high doses, and in those who are age 50 and older. It is not clear whether omeprazole is the actual cause of an increased risk of fracture. Before you take this medication, tell your doctor if you have osteoporosis or osteopenia (low bone mineral density).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Prilosec will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Omeprazole can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking Prilosec. Do not give this medication to a child younger than 1 year old without the advice of a doctor.

See also: Prilosec pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Prilosec?

Take Prilosec exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Prilosec is usually taken before eating. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

You may open the Prilosec delayed-release capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce to make swallowing easier. Swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Discard the empty capsule.

Dissolve the powder in a small amount of water. Use 1 teaspoon of water for the 2.5-mg packet, or 1 Tablespoon of water for the 10-mg packet. Let the mixture stand for 2 or 3 minutes, then stir and drink right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away. This mixture can also be given through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube using only a catheter-tipped syringe. Shake the syringe well, then attach it to the NG tube and push the plunger down to empty the syringe into the tube. Refill the syringe with water and flush the tube to wash the contents down.

Prilosec OTC (over-the-counter) should be taken only once every 24 hours for 14 days. Take the medicine in the morning before you eat breakfast. It may take up to 4 days for full effect. Do not take more than one tablet every 24 hours.

Allow at least 4 months to pass before you start another 14-day treatment with Prilosec OTC. Call your doctor if you have additional symptoms and need treatment before the 4 months has passed.

Do not crush, chew, or break a Prilosec OTC tablet. Swallow the pill whole. Take Prilosec for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking this medicine.

Prilosec can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using omeprazole.

Store Prilosec at room temperature away from moisture and heat.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, nausea, vomiting, sweating, headache, or dry mouth.
What should I avoid while taking Prilosec?

This medication can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking Prilosec and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Follow your doctor’s instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.
Prilosec side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Prilosec: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms of low magnesium:

*

  dizziness, confusion;
*

  fast or uneven heart rate;
*

  jerking muscle movements;
*

  feeling jittery;
*

  diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
*

  muscle cramps, muscle weakness or limp feeling;
*

  cough or choking feeling; or
*

  seizure (convulsions).

Less serious Prilosec side effects may include:

*

  fever;
*

  cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat;
*

  stomach pain, gas;
*

  nausea, vomiting, mild diarrhea; or
*

  headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Prilosec side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Prilosec?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

*

  ampicillin (Principen, Unasyn);
*

  cilostazol (Pletal);
*

  clopidogrel (Plavix);
*

  cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);
*

  diazepam (Valium);
*

  digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);
*

  disulfiram (Antabuse);
*

  iron (Feosol, Mol-Iron, Fergon, Femiron,others);
*

  phenytoin (Dilantin);
*

  rifampin (Rifater, Rifadin, Rifamate);
*

  tacrolimus (Prograf);
*

  antifungal medicine such as ketoconazole (Nizoral) or voriconazole (Vfend);
*

  a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);
*

  a diuretic (water pill); or
*

  HIV or AIDS medications such as atazanavir (Reyataz), nelfinavir (Viracept), saquinavir (Invirase).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Prilosec. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy prevacid online cheaply!

What is lansoprazole?

Lansoprazole is a proton pump inhibitors. Lansoprazole decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Lansoprazole is used to treat and prevent stomach and intestinal ulcers, erosive esophagitis (damage to the esophagus from stomach acid), and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Lansoprazole is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Lansoprazole may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about lansoprazole?

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take lansoprazole if you have liver disease, or low levels of magnesium in your blood.

Lansoprazole is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of lansoprazole and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

If you also take sucralfate (Carafate), avoid taking it at the same time you take lansoprazole. Sucralfate can make it harder for your body to absorb lansoprazole. Wait at least 30 minutes after taking lansoprazole before you take sucralfate.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

Prevacid 24HR should be taken only once every 24 hours for 14 days. It may take up to 4 days for full effect. Do not take more than one tablet every 24 hours.

Allow at least 4 months to pass before you start another 14-day treatment with Prevacid 24HR. Call your doctor if you have additional symptoms and need treatment before the 4 months has passed.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lansoprazole?

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to lansoprazole.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take lansoprazole if you have liver disease, or low levels of magnesium in your blood.

Do not use over-the-counter lansoprazole (Prevacid 24HR) without the advice of a doctor if you have:

trouble or pain with swallowing;

bloody or black stools;

vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds;

heartburn that has lasted for over 3 months;

frequent chest pain;

heartburn with wheezing;

unexplained weight loss;

nausea or vomiting;

stomach pain; or

an electrolyte imbalance or metabolic disorder.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of lansoprazole and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Taking a proton pump inhibitor such as lansoprazole may increase your risk of bone fracture in the hip, wrist, or spine. This effect has occurred mostly in people who have taken the medication long term or at high doses, and in those who are age 50 and older. It is not clear whether lansoprazole is the actual cause of an increased risk of fracture. Before you take this medication, tell your doctor if you have osteoporosis or osteopenia (low bone mineral density).

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether lansoprazole passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Some forms of lansoprazole may contain phenylalanine. Tell your doctor if you have phenylketonuria.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 1 year old.
How should I take lansoprazole?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Lansoprazole is usually taken before eating. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Do not crush or break a delayed-release capsule. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

If you are unable to swallow a delayed-release capsule whole: Open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of pudding, applesauce, yogurt, cottage cheese, strained pears, or a nutritional drink such as Ensure. Swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Discard the empty capsule.

You may also dissolve the medicine from a lansoprazole capsule in 2 ounces (1/4 cup) of apple juice, orange juice, or tomato juice. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more juice to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Dissolve the oral granules in 2 tablespoons of water. Use only water when mixing lansoprazole oral granules. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure the liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

To take lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablet: Use dry hands to remove the tablet and place it in your mouth. It will begin to dissolve right away. Allow the tablet to dissolve in your mouth without chewing, swallowing several times as it dissolves.

The orally disintegrating tablet should not be given with an oral syringe or given through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube. The tablet may not dissolve completely and could clog the syringe or tube.

Prevacid 24HR should be taken only once every 24 hours for 14 days. Take the medicine in the morning before you eat breakfast. It may take up to 4 days for full effect. Do not take more than one tablet every 24 hours.

Allow at least 4 months to pass before you start another 14-day treatment with Prevacid 24HR. Call your doctor if you have additional symptoms and need treatment before the 4 months has passed.

Do not crush, chew, or break a Prevacid 24HR capsule. Swallow the pill whole.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not freeze the liquid medicine and protect it from light.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.
What should I avoid while taking lansoprazole?

This medication can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking lansoprazole and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

If you also take sucralfate (Carafate), avoid taking it at the same time you take lansoprazole. Sucralfate can make it harder for your body to absorb lansoprazole. Wait at least 30 minutes after taking lansoprazole before you take sucralfate.
Lansoprazole side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using lansoprazole and call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of low magnesium:

dizziness, confusion;

fast or uneven heart rate;

jerky muscle movements;

feeling jittery;

diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

muscle cramps, muscle weakness or limp feeling;

cough or choking feeling; or

seizure.

Less serious side effects may include:

headache;

nausea, stomach pain;

mild diarrhea; or

constipation.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Prevacid side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect lansoprazole?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

ampicillin (Principen, Unasyn);

atazanavir (Reyataz);

digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);

iron (Feosol, Mol-Iron, Fergon, Femiron, others);

ketoconazole (Nizoral);

methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall);

theophylline (such as Elixophyllin, Respbid, Slo-Bid, Theobid, Theoclear, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); or

a diuretic (water pill).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with lansoprazole. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy premarin online cheaply!

What is Premarin?

Premarin tablets contain conjugated estrogens, a mixture of estrogens obtained from natural sources. Estrogen is a female sex hormone produced by the ovaries. Estrogen is necessary for many processes in the body.

Premarin is used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men.

Premarin should not be used to prevent heart disease or dementia, because this medicine may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions.

Premarin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Premarin

Do not use Premarin if you have any of the following conditions: a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot (especially in your lung or your lower body), liver disease, abnormal vaginal bleeding, or a hormone-related cancer such as breast or uterine cancer. Premarin can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. Do not use if you are pregnant.
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Learn the signs of RA and how to relieve the pain.

Long-term use of Premarin may increase your risk of breast cancer, heart attack, stroke, or blood clot. Talk with your doctor about your individual risks before using conjugated estrogens long term.

Have regular physical exams and self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis while using Premarin.

Premarin should not be used to prevent heart disease, strokes, or dementia, because this medicine may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions.
Before taking Premarin

Do not use Premarin if you have:

*

  a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot (especially in your lung or your lower body);
*

  abnormal vaginal bleeding that a doctor has not checked;
*

  a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder;
*

  liver disease; or
*

  any type of breast, uterine, or hormone-dependent cancer.

To make sure you can safely take Premarin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

*

  high blood pressure, heart disease, or circulation problems;
*

  a personal or family history of stroke;
*

  endometriosis;
*

  kidney disease;
*

  asthma;
*

  hereditary angioedema;
*

  epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
*

  migraines;
*

  diabetes;
*

  underactive thyroid;
*

  high cholesterol or triglycerides;
*

  high or low levels of calcium in your blood;
*

  porphyria;
*

  systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); or
*

  gallbladder disease.

Premarin increase your risk of developing endometrial hyperplasia, a condition that may lead to cancer of the uterus. Taking progestins while using Premarin may lower this risk. If your uterus has not been removed, your doctor may prescribe a progestin for you to take while you are using Premarin.

Long-term use of Premarin may increase your risk of breast cancer, heart attack, stroke, or blood clot. Talk with your doctor about your individual risks before using conjugated estrogens long term, especially if you smoke or are overweight. Your doctor should check your progress on a regular basis (every 3 to 6 months) to determine whether you should continue this treatment.

FDA pregnancy category X. Premarin can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. Do not use Premarin if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Use effective birth control while you are using this medication. Conjugated estrogens can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Premarin may also slow breast milk production. Do not use if you are breast-feeding a baby. Do not give this medication to anyone under 18 years old without the advice of a doctor.

See also: Premarin pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Premarin?

Take Premarin exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Premarin are sometimes taken on a daily basis. For certain conditions, the medication is given in a cycle, such as 3 weeks on followed by 1 week off. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

If you see what looks like part of a Premarin tablet in your stool, talk with your doctor.

Have regular physical exams and self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis while using Premarin.

Use Premarin regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested often. Your thyroid function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you need surgery or medical tests or if you will be on bed rest, you may need to stop using this medication for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are taking Premarin.

Store Premarin at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the medicine container tightly closed.

See also: Premarin dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, or vaginal bleeding.
What should I avoid while taking Premarin?

Do not smoke while using Premarin. Smoking can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack caused by this medication.
Premarin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Premarin: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using Premarin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

*

  chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
*

  sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;
*

  sudden severe headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;
*

  pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in one or both legs;
*

  abnormal vaginal bleeding;
*

  migraine headache;
*

  pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach;
*

  confusion, problems with memory or concentration;
*

  jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
*

  swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or
*

  a breast lump.

Less serious Premarin side effects may include:

*

  mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps;
*

  breast pain, tenderness, or swelling;
*

  freckles or darkening of facial skin;
*

  increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair;
*

  changes in weight or appetite;
*

  problems with contact lenses;
*

  vaginal itching or discharge;
*

  changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or
*

  mild headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Premarin side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Premarin?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

*

  a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);
*

  a thyroid medication such as levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid and others);
*

  insulin or diabetes medicine taken by mouth;
*

  rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane);
*

  ketoconazole (Nizoral) or itraconazole (Sporanox);
*

  seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol), felbamate (Felbatol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), or primidone (Mysoline);
*

  a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or
*

  antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Premarin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.