How to buy prednisolone online cheaply!

What is prednisolone?

Prednisolone is a steroid. It prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Prednisolone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders.

Prednisolone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about prednisolone?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to prednisolone, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body.

Before taking prednisolone, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, and about all other medicines you are using. There are many other diseases that can be affected by steroid use, and many other medicines that can interact with steroids.

Your steroid medication needs may change if you have any unusual stress such as a serious illness, fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Tell your doctor about any such situation that affects you during treatment.
Video: Treatment for Depression
Video preview

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection or worsening an infection you already have or have recently had. Tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using steroid medication.

Do not receive a “live” vaccine while using prednisolone. The vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease.

Do not stop using prednisolone suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using prednisolone.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take prednisolone. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you take steroid medication.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking prednisolone?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to prednisolone, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body.

Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection. Steroids can also worsen an infection you already have, or reactivate an infection you recently had. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

To make sure prednisolone is safe for you, tell your doctor about your other medical conditions, especially:

liver disease (such as cirrhosis);

kidney disease;

a thyroid disorder;

diabetes;

a history of malaria;

tuberculosis;

osteoporosis;

a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis;

glaucoma or cataracts;

herpes infection of the eyes;

stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, or diverticulitis;

depression or mental illness;

congestive heart failure; or

high blood pressure

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether prednisolone will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

Prednisolone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Steroids can affect growth in children. Talk with your doctor if you think your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medication.
How should I take prednisolone?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Your steroid medication needs may change if you have unusual stress such as a serious illness, fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Tell your doctor about any such situation that affects you.

Measure the liquid form of prednisolone with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

You may need to shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Follow the directions on your medicine label.

Keep the disintegrating tablet in its blister pack until you are ready to take the medicine. Open the package using dry hands, and peel back the foil from the tablet blister (do not push the tablet through the foil). Remove the tablet and place it in your mouth.

Allow the disintegrating tablet to dissolve in your mouth without chewing. Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves. If desired, you may drink liquid to help swallow the dissolved tablet.

Steroids can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using prednisolone.

Do not stop using prednisolone suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using prednisolone.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take prednisolone. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you take steroid medication.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Prednisolone dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose or forget to take your medicine.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

An overdose of prednisolone is not expected to produce life threatening symptoms. However, long term use of high steroid doses can lead to symptoms such as thinning skin, easy bruising, changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your face, neck, back, and waist), increased acne or facial hair, menstrual problems, impotence, or loss of interest in sex.
What should I avoid while taking prednisolone?

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using steroid medication.

Do not receive a “live” vaccine while using prednisolone. The vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease. Live vaccines include measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), Bacillus Calmette-GuĂ©rin (BCG), oral polio, rotavirus, smallpox, typhoid, yellow fever, varicella (chickenpox), zoster (shingles), and nasal flu (influenza) vaccine.

Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking prednisolone.
Prednisolone side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

problems with your vision;

swelling, rapid weight gain, feeling short of breath;

severe depression, unusual thoughts or behavior, seizure (convulsions);

bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood;

pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate);

low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling); or

dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure).

Less serious side effects may include:

sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes;

acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration;

slow wound healing;

increased sweating;

headache, dizziness, spinning sensation;

nausea, stomach pain, bloating; or

changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, face, neck, breasts, and waist).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: prednisolone side effects (in more detail)
Prednisolone Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Multiple Sclerosis:

Tablets and syrup for acute exacerbations: 200 mg daily for one week followed by 80 mg every other day for 1 month.

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia:

Tablets and syrup for acute exacerbations: 200 mg daily for one week followed by 80 mg every other day for 1 month.

Usual Adult Dose for Anti-inflammatory:

Sodium phosphate:

Oral: 5 to 60 mg per day in divided doses 1 to 4 times/day.

Intravenous or Intramuscular: 4 to 60 mg/day

For intraarticular, intralesional or soft tissue administration:
Large joints: 10 to 20 mg
Small joints: 4 to 5 mg
Bursae: 10 to 15 mg
Tendon sheaths: 2 to 5 mg
Soft tissue infiltration: 10 to 30 mg
Ganglia: 5 to 10 mg

Injectable suspension (tebutate) for intraarticular, intralesional or soft tissue administration:
Large joints: 20 to 30 mg (doses > 40 mg not recommended)
Small joints: 8 to 10 mg
Bursae: 20 to 30 mg
Tendon sheaths: 4 to 10 mg
Ganglia: 10 to 20 mg

Injectable suspension (acetate) for intraarticular, intralesional or soft tissue administration: 4 to 100 mg
Bursae: 10 to 15 mg
Tendon sheaths: 2 to 5 mg
Soft tissue infiltration: 10 to 30 mg

Usual Pediatric Dose for Immunosuppression:

Oral: 0.1 to 2 mg/kg/day in divided doses 1 to 4 times a day.

Intravenous: 0.1 to 2 mg/kg/day in divided doses 1 to 4 times a day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Asthma — Acute:

Oral: 1 to 2 mg/kg/day in divided doses 1 to 2 times a day for 3 to 5 days.

Intravenous: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided 3 or 4 times a day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Nephrotic Syndrome:

First 3 episodes: Initial dose: 2 mg/kg/day (maximum dose 80 mg/day) until urine is free of protein for 3 consecutive days (maximum: 28 days); followed by 1 to 1.5 mg/kg/dose every other day for 4 weeks.

Frequent relapses or long-term maintenance dose: 0.5 to 1 mg/kg/dose given every other day for 3 to 6 months.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia:

2 mg/kg/day orally divided twice daily for 5 days, followed by 1 mg/kg/day once daily for 3 days, followed by 1 mg/kg/dose every other day for 3 doses.
What other drugs will affect prednisolone?

Many drugs can interact with prednisolone. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

aspirin (taken on a daily basis or at high doses);

a diuretic (water pill);

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);

insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth;

ketoconazole (Nizoral);

rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane); or

seizure medications such as phenytoin (Dilantin) or phenobarbital (Solfoton).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with prednisolone. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy pravachol online cheaply!

What is Pravachol?

Pravachol (pravastatin) is in a group of drugs called HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, or “statins.” Pravastatin reduces levels of “bad” cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL) and triglycerides in the blood, while increasing levels of “good” cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, or HDL).

Pravachol is used to lower cholesterol and triglycerides (types of fat) in the blood.

Pravachol is also used to lower the risk of stroke, heart attack, and other heart complications in people with diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other risk factors

Pravachol is used in adults and children who are at least 8 years old.

Pravachol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Pravachol

You should not take Pravachol if you are allergic to pravastatin, if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, or if you have liver disease. Stop taking Pravachol and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant.

Before taking Pravachol, tell your doctor if you have ever had liver or kidney disease, diabetes, or a thyroid disorder, or if you drink more than 2 alcoholic beverages daily.

In rare cases, Pravachol can cause a condition that results in the breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to kidney failure. Call your doctor right away if you have unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness especially if you also have fever, unusual tiredness, and dark colored urine.

Avoid eating foods that are high in fat or cholesterol. Pravachol will not be as effective in lowering your cholesterol if you do not follow a cholesterol-lowering diet plan.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can raise triglyceride levels and may increase your risk of liver damage.

There are many other drugs that can increase your risk of serious medical problems if you take them together with Pravachol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Pravachol is only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.
Before taking Pravachol

You should not take Pravachol if you are allergic to pravastatin, if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, or if you have liver disease.

To make sure you can safely take Pravachol, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

* history of liver disease;
* history of kidney disease;
*

  diabetes;
*

  a thyroid disorder; or
*

  if you drink more than 2 alcoholic beverages daily.

In rare cases, Pravachol can cause a condition that results in the breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to kidney failure. This condition may be more likely to occur in older adults and in people who have kidney disease or poorly controlled hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid).

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use. Certain other drugs can increase your risk of serious muscle problems, and it is very important that your doctor knows if you are using any of them:

*

  gemfibrozil (Lopid), fenofibric acid (Fibricor, Trilipix), or fenofibrate (Antara, Fenoglide, Lipofen, Lofibra, Tricor, Triglide);
*

  medicines that contain niacin (Advicor, Niaspan, Niacor, Simcor, Slo-Niacin, and others); or
*

  drugs that weaken your immune system, such as steroids, cancer medicine, or medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, such as cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune), sirolimus (Rapamune), or tacrolimus (Prograf).

FDA pregnancy category X. Pravachol can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects. Do not take Pravachol if you are pregnant. Stop taking this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Use effective birth control to avoid pregnancy while you are taking Pravachol. Pravastatin may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not breast-feed while you are taking Pravachol.

See also: Pravachol pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Pravachol?

Take Pravachol exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Pravachol is usually taken once a day, with or without food. Take the medicine at the same time each day. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

You may need to stop using Pravachol for a short time if you have:

*

  uncontrolled seizures;
*

  an electrolyte imbalance (such as high or low potassium levels in your blood);
*

  severely low blood pressure;
*

  a severe infection or illness; or
*

  surgery or a medical emergency.

To be sure Pravachol is helping your condition and is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Pravachol is only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

You may need to take Pravachol on a long-term basis for the treatment of high cholesterol. Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

See also: Pravachol dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.
What should I avoid while taking Pravachol?

If you also take cholestyramine (Prevalite, Questran) or colestipol (Colestid), avoid taking them within 1 hour after or 4 hours before you take Pravachol.

Avoid eating foods that are high in fat or cholesterol. Pravachol will not be as effective in lowering your cholesterol if you do not follow a cholesterol-lowering diet plan.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can raise triglyceride levels and may increase your risk of liver damage.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with Pravachol. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor.
Pravachol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Pravachol: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking Pravachol and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

*

  unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness;
*

  confusion, memory problems;
*

  fever, unusual tiredness, and dark colored urine;
*

  chest pain;
*

  increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, weight loss);
*

  swelling, weight gain, urinating less than usual or not at all; or
*

  nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious Pravachol side effects may include:

*

  headache;
*

  mild muscle pain;
*

  diarrhea;
*

  mild skin rash; or
*

  dizziness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Pravachol side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Pravachol?

Before taking Pravachol, tell your doctor about all other medicines you are using, especially:

*

  cimetidine (Tagamet);
*

  spironolactone (Aldactone, Aldactazide); or
*

  any other "statin" medication such as atorvastatin (Lipitor, Caduet), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Altoprev, Mevacor), rosuvastatin (Crestor), or simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Pravachol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy plavix online cheaply!

What is Plavix?

Plavix (clopidogrel) keeps the platelets in your blood from coagulating (clotting) to prevent unwanted blood clots that can occur with certain heart or blood vessel conditions.

Plavix is used to prevent blood clots after a recent heart attack or stroke, and in people with certain disorders of the heart or blood vessels.

Plavix may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Plavix

Plavix keeps your blood from coagulating (clotting) to prevent unwanted blood clots that can occur with certain heart or blood vessel conditions. Because of this drug action, Plavix can make it easier for you to bleed, even from a minor injury. Contact your doctor or seek emergency medical attention if you have bleeding that will not stop.

You may also have bleeding on the inside of your body, such as in your stomach or intestines. Call your doctor at once if you have black or bloody stools, or if you cough up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds. These could be signs of bleeding in your digestive tract.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of bleeding in your stomach or intestines.

If you need surgery or dental work, tell the surgeon or dentist ahead of time that you are using Plavix. You may need to stop using the medicine for at least 5 days before having surgery, to prevent excessive bleeding. Follow your doctor’s instructions and start taking Plavix again as soon as possible.

While you are taking Plavix, do not take aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) without your doctor’s advice. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use to prevent blood clots.
Before taking Plavix

Do not use Plavix if you are allergic to clopidogrel, or if you have any active bleeding such as a stomach ulcer or bleeding in the brain (such as from a head injury).

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests:

*

  a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, such as TTP (thrombocytopenic purpura) or hemophilia;
*

  a history of stroke, including TIA ("mini-stroke");
*

  a stomach ulcer or ulcerative colitis; or
*

  kidney disease.

FDA pregnancy category B. Plavix is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether clopidogrel passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking Plavix.

See also: Plavix pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Plavix?

Take Plavix exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take Plavix with a full glass of water.

Plavix can be taken with or without food.

Because Plavix keeps your blood from coagulating (clotting) to prevent unwanted blood clots, it can also make it easier for you to bleed, even from a minor injury. Contact your doctor or seek emergency medical attention if you have bleeding that will not stop.

If you need surgery or dental work, tell the surgeon or dentist ahead of time that you are using Plavix. You may need to stop using the medicine for at least 5 days before having surgery, to prevent excessive bleeding. Follow your doctor’s instructions and start taking Plavix again as soon as possible. Do not stop using Plavix without first talking to your doctor. Use Plavix regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

To be sure this medicine is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Store Plavix at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Plavix dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include vomiting, feeling exhausted or short of breath, and blood in your stools or vomit.
What should I avoid while taking Plavix?

While you are taking Plavix, do not take aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) without your doctor’s advice. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

Avoid activities that may increase your risk of bleeding or injury. Use extra care to prevent bleeding while shaving or brushing your teeth.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of bleeding in your stomach or intestines.
Plavix side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Plavix: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Plavix and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

*

  nosebleed or other bleeding that will not stop;
*

  bloody or tarry stools, blood in your urine;
*

  coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
*

  chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
*

  sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;
*

  sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;
*

  pale skin, weakness, fever, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
*

  easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin.

Less serious Plavix side effects may include itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Plavix side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Plavix?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use to prevent blood clots, including:

*

  abciximab (ReoPro);
*

  dalteparin (Fragmin);
*

  enoxaparin (Lovenox);
*

  eptifibatide (Integrilin);
*

  fondaparinux (Arixtra);
*

  heparin;
*

  ticlopidine (Ticlid);
*

  tinzaparin (Innohep);
*

  tirofiban (Aggrastat);
*

  urokinase (Abbokinase); and
*

  warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

*

  armodafinil (Nuvigil) or modafinil (Provigil);
*

  fluoxetine (Prozac) or fluvoxamine (Luvox);
*

  gemfibrozil (Lopid);
*

  isoniazid (Rifamate, Rifater);
*

  a cancer medication such as dasatinib (Sprycel), letrozole (Femara), ibritumomab (Zevalin), or tositumomab (Bexxar);
*

  certain stomach acid reducers, such as cimetidine (Tagamet), esomeprazole (Nexium), or omeprazole (Prilosec, Prilosec OTC, Zegerid);
*

  an antifungal medication such as fluconazole (Diflucan), ketoconazole (Nizoral), or voriconazole (Vfend);
*

  HIV medications such as delavirdine (Rescriptor), efavirenz (Sustiva, Atripla), etravirine (Intelence), or tipranavir (Aptivus); or
*

  seizure medication such as felbamate (Felbatol) or oxcarbazepine (Trileptal).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Plavix. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy phenergan online cheaply!

What is Phenergan?

Phenergan is an antihistamine. It blocks the effects of the naturally occurring chemical histamine in your body.

Phenergan is used to treat allergy symptoms such as itching, runny nose, sneezing, itchy or watery eyes, hives, and itchy skin rashes.

Phenergan also prevents motion sickness, and treats nausea and vomiting or pain after surgery. It is also used as a sedative or sleep aid.

Phenergan may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Phenergan

Stop using Phenergan and call your doctor at once if you have twitching or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs. These could be early signs of dangerous side effects. Phenergan should not be given to a child younger than 2 years old. Phenergan can cause severe breathing problems or death in a child younger than 2. Carefully follow your doctor’s instructions when giving this medicine to a child of any age. Phenergan can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol, which can increase some of the side effects of Phenergan. There are many other medicines that can interact with Phenergan. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you.
Video: Treatment for Depression
Video preview

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.
What should I discuss with my doctor before taking Phenergan?

Phenergan should not be given to a child younger than 2 years old. Phenergan can cause severe breathing problems or death in a child younger than 2. Carefully follow your doctor’s instructions when giving this medicine to a child of any age. Do not use Phenergan if you have severe asthma, emphysema, or other breathing problem, or if you are allergic to Phenergan or other phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine, Compro), thioridazine (Mellaril), or trifluoperazine (Stelazine).

If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use Phenergan. Before you take Phenergan, tell your doctor if you have:

*

  a history of seizures;
*

  heart disease or high blood pressure;
* liver or kidney disease;
*

  severe asthma, emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or other breathing problem;
*

  sleep apnea (breathing stops during sleep);
*

  glaucoma;
*

  a stomach ulcer or digestive obstruction;
*

  bone marrow depression;
*

  adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma);
*

  enlarged prostate or problems with urination;
*

  low levels of calcium in your blood (hypocalcemia); or
*

  if you have ever had a serious side effect while using Phenergan or any other phenothiazine.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Phenergan is harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether Phenergan passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Phenergan without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Older adults may be more likely to have side effects from Phenergan.

See also: Phenergan pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Phenergan?

Take Phenergan exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

Phenergan can be taken with or without food or milk.

Measure liquid medicine with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse while taking Phenergan.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using Phenergan.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include severe drowsiness, dizziness, dry mouth, large pupils, flushing, nausea, vomiting, shallow breathing, and fainting.
What should I avoid while taking Phenergan?

Phenergan can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of Phenergan. Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Phenergan can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight, and a sunburn may result. Wear sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher) and protective clothing if you must be outdoors.

See also: Phenergan and alcohol (in more detail)
Phenergan side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Phenergan and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

*

  twitching, or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs;
*

  tremor (uncontrolled shaking), drooling, trouble swallowing, problems with balance or walking;
*

  feeling restless, jittery, or agitated;
*

  high fever, stiff muscles, confusion, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats, rapid breathing;
*

  feeling like you might pass out;
*

  seizure (convulsions);
*

  pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, fever, sore throat, flu symptoms;
*

  decreased night vision, tunnel vision, watery eyes, increased sensitivity to light;
*

  hallucinations, agitation;
*

  nausea and stomach pain, skin rash, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
*

  urinating less than usual or not at all;
*

  joint pain or swelling with fever, swollen glands, muscle aches, chest pain, vomiting, unusual thoughts or behavior, and patchy skin color; or
*

  slow heart rate, weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing (breathing may stop).

Less serious Phenergan side effects may include:

*

  dizziness, drowsiness, anxiety;
*

  blurred vision, dry mouth, stuffy nose;
*

  ringing in your ears;
*

  weight gain, swelling in your hands or feet;
*

  impotence, trouble having an orgasm; or
*

  constipation.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Phenergan side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Phenergan?

Cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can interact with Phenergan and cause medical problems or increase side effects. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines.

Also tell your doctor if you are using any of the following medicines:

*

  lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid);
*

  atropine (Atreza, Sal-Tropine), belladonna (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop);
*

  blood pressure medication such as guanadrel (Hylorel), guanethidine (Ismelin), propranolol (Inderal), and others;
*

  a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);
*

  bronchodilators such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);
*

  bladder or urinary medications such as oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), solifenacin (Vesicare), and others;
*

  an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), tranylcypromine (Parnate), phenelzine (Nardil), or selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam); or
*

  medicines to treat Parkinson's disease, restless leg syndrome, or pituitary gland tumor (prolactinoma); or
*

  medicine to treat stomach ulcer or irritable bowel syndrome, such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), glycopyrrolate (Robinul), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), mepenzolate (Cantil), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine).

This list is not complete and there are many other medicines that can interact with Phenergan. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you.

How to buy persantine online cheaply!

What is Persantine (dipyridamole)?

Dipyridamole keeps the platelets in your blood from coagulating (clotting) to prevent blood clots from forming on or around an artificial heart valve.

Dipyridamole is used to prevent blood clots after heart valve replacement surgery.

Dipyridamole may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about Persantine (dipyridamole)?

Before taking dipyridamole, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, low blood pressure, coronary artery disease, angina (chest pain), or if you have recently had a heart attack.

Dipyridamole is often taken together with other medications to prevent blood clots. To best treat your condition, use all of your medications as directed by your doctor. Be sure to read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each of your medications. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without advice from your doctor.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your doctor may need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

While you are taking dipyridamole, do not take aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) without your doctor’s advice. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.

There may be other drugs that can affect dipyridamole. During your treatment with dipyridamole, you may also be taking another blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). There are many drugs that can interact with blood thinners.

Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Persantine (dipyridamole)?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to dipyridamole.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may not be able to use dipyridamole, or you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication:

liver disease;

low blood pressure;

severe coronary artery disease (also called atherosclerosis);

uncontrolled chest pain (angina); or

if you have recently had a heart attack.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Dipyridamole can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing infant. Do not take this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 12 years old without the advice of a doctor.
How should I take Persantine (dipyridamole)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take dipyridamole with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

Dipyridamole is often taken together with other medications to prevent blood clots. To best treat your condition, use all of your medications as directed by your doctor. Be sure to read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each of your medications. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without advice from your doctor.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your doctor may need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Store dipyridamole at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Persantine dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include sweating, warmth or tingly feeling under your skin, dizziness, weakness, restlessness, fast heart rate, feeling light-headed, or fainting.
What should I avoid while taking Persantine (dipyridamole)?

While you are taking dipyridamole, do not take aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) without your doctor’s advice. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.
Persantine (dipyridamole) side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

nosebleed or other bleeding that will not stop;

black, bloody, or tarry stools; or

coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness;

upset stomach, diarrhea, vomiting;

warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;

muscle or joint pain;

headache; or

mild skin rash or itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Persantine side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Persantine (dipyridamole)?

There may be other drugs that can affect dipyridamole. During your treatment with dipyridamole, you may also be taking another blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). There are many drugs that can interact with blood thinners.

Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy periactin online cheaply!

What is Periactin (cyproheptadine)?

Cyproheptadine an antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose

Cyproheptadine is used to treat sneezing, itching, watery eyes, runny nose, and other symptoms of allergies.

Cyproheptadine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about Periactin (cyproheptadine)?

Always ask a doctor before giving a cold or allergy medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cold and allergy medicines in very young children.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to cyproheptadine, or if you have narrow-angle glaucoma, a stomach ulcer or obstruction, an enlarged prostate or urination problems, if you are having an asthma attack, or if you are elderly or have a debilitating disease.
Video: Asthma
Video preview

How to prevent and treat an asthma attack.

Before taking cyproheptadine, tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, a history of asthma, high blood pressure, heart disease, or an overactive thyroid.

Cyproheptadine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of cyproheptadine.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Periactin (cyproheptadine)?

Do not use cyproheptadine if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

You should not use cyproheptadine if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

narrow-angle glaucoma;

a stomach ulcer or obstruction;

an enlarged prostate or urination problems;

if you are having an asthma attack; or

if you are elderly or have a debilitating disease.

To make sure you can safely take cyproheptadine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

glaucoma;

a history of asthma;

high blood pressure;

heart disease; or

an overactive thyroid.

FDA pregnancy category B. Cyproheptadine is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether cyproheptadine passes into breast milk, but if it does it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication while you are breast-feeding a baby.
How should I take Periactin (cyproheptadine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Do not give this medication to a child younger than 4 years old. Always ask a doctor before giving a cold or allergy medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cold and allergy medicines in very young children.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, confusion, hallucinations, very dry mouth, dilated pupils, pale skin, vomiting, or fainting.
What should I avoid while taking Periactin (cyproheptadine)?

Cyproheptadine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Drinking alcohol can increase some of the side effects of cyproheptadine.
Periactin (cyproheptadine) side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking cyproheptadine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior;

seizure (convulsions);

ringing in your ears;

feeling like you might pass out;

fast or pounding heartbeats;

easy bruising or bleeding;

urinating less than usual or not at all; or

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, or unusual weakness.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild drowsiness, dizziness, or spinning sensation;

feeling restlessness or excited (especially in children);

sleep problems (insomnia), tired feeling;

numbness or tingly feeling;

increased sweating or urination;

blurred vision;

appetite changes;

dry mouth or nose, upset stomach; or

nausea, diarrhea, constipation.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Periactin side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Periactin (cyproheptadine)?

Cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by cyproheptadine. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other antihistamine.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with cyproheptadine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy pepcid online cheaply!

What is Pepcid?

Pepcid (famotidine) is a histamine-2 blocker. It works by decreasing the amount of acid the stomach produces.

Pepcid is used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines. It also treats conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Pepcid also treats gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn.

Pepcid may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Pepcid

You should not use Pepcid if you are allergic to famotidine or similar medications such as ranitidine (Zantac), cimetidine (Tagamet), or nizatidine (Axid).

Before taking Pepcid, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, a history of Long QT syndrome, stomach cancer or other problems, or asthma, COPD, or other breathing problems.

Avoid taking cimetidine (Tagamet), ranitidine (Zantac), or nizatidine (Axid) while you are taking Pepcid, unless your doctor has told you to.

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Pepcid may be only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes changes in diet or lifestyle habits. Follow your doctor’s instructions very closely.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.
Before taking Pepcid

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

You should not use Pepcid if you are allergic to famotidine or similar medications such as ranitidine (Zantac), cimetidine (Tagamet), or nizatidine (Axid).

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take Pepcid if you have:

* kidney disease;
* liver disease;
*

  a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome;
*

  stomach cancer or other problems; or
*

  asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or other breathing problems.

FDA pregnancy category B. Pepcid is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Famotidine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use Pepcid without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

See also: Pepcid pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Pepcid?

Use Pepcid exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

The chewable tablet must be chewed thoroughly before swallowing.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) for 5 to 10 seconds before you measure a dose. Measure the liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. Although most ulcers heal within 4 weeks of Pepcid treatment, it may take up to 8 weeks of using this medicine before your ulcer heals. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 weeks of treatment.

Pepcid may be only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes changes in diet or lifestyle habits. Follow your doctor’s instructions very closely.

Store Pepcid at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Throw away any unused Pepcid liquid that is older than 30 days.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, fast heart rate, or fainting.
What should I avoid while taking Pepcid?

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of damage to your stomach.

Avoid taking cimetidine (Tagamet), ranitidine (Zantac), or nizatidine (Axid) while you are taking Pepcid, unless your doctor has told you to.

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.
Pepcid side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Pepcid: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Pepcid and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

*

  easy bruising or bleeding;
*

  fast or pounding heartbeat;
*

  confusion, hallucinations, seizure;
*

  numbness or tingly feeling; or
*

  jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious Pepcid side effects may include:

*

  nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation;
*

  dry mouth;
*

  dizziness, weakness, mood changes;
*

  headache; or
*

  muscle cramps, joint pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Pepcid side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Pepcid?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

*

  atazanavir (Reyataz);
*

  itraconazole (Sporanox);
*

  ketoconazole (Nizoral); or
*

  aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Pepcid. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy paxil online cheaply!

What is Paxil?

Paxil (paroxetine) is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Paxil affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced.

Paxil is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Paxil may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information Paxil

Do not take Paxil together with pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), linezolid (Zyvox), methylene blue (Urolene Blue), or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects.

Before you take Paxil, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease, a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, seizures, glaucoma, bipolar disorder, or a history of drug abuse or suicidal thoughts.
Video: Treatment for Depression
Video preview

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

There are many other drugs that can interact with Paxil. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Paxil may cause harm to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking Paxil.

Paxil may cause heart defects or serious lung problems in a newborn if you take the medication during pregnancy. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant during pregnancy.

Do not start or stop taking Paxil during pregnancy without your doctor’s advice.

You may have thoughts about suicide when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.
Before taking Paxil

Do not take Paxil together with pimozide (Orap), thioridazine (Mellaril), linezolid (Zyvox), methylene blue (Urolene Blue), or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects. You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAO inhibitor before you can take Paxil. After you stop taking Paxil, you must wait at least 14 days before you start taking an MAOI.

Tell your doctor about all other antidepressants you take, especially Celexa, Cymbalta, Desyrel, Effexor, Lexapro, Luvox, Oleptro, Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax, Viibryd, or Zoloft.

To make sure you can safely take Paxil, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

*

  liver or kidney disease;
*

  a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;
*

  seizures or epilepsy;
*

  narrrow-angle glaucoma; or
*

  bipolar disorder (manic depression), or a history of drug abuse or suicidal thoughts.

You may have thoughts about suicide while taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits for at least the first 12 weeks of treatment.

FDA pregnancy category D. Paxil may cause heart defects or serious lung problems in a newborn if you take the medication during pregnancy. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant during pregnancy. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking Paxil. Do not start or stop taking Paxil during pregnancy without your doctor’s advice. Paroxetine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

See also: Paxil pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Paxil?

Take Paxil exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Do not crush, chew, or break a Paxil CR extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. Shake the Paxil oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure the liquid with a special dose measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. It may take up to 4 weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment.

You may have withdrawal symptoms (such as agitation, dizziness, numbness or tingling, ringing in your ears, confusion, or behavior changes) after you stop taking Paxil. Do not stop taking this medication suddenly without first talking to your doctor.

Store Paxil at room temperature away from moisture and heat.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of Paxil can be fatal. Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, vomiting, tremor, confusion, decreased urination, blurred vision, rapid heartbeat, aggression, seizures, and coma.
What should I avoid while taking Paxil?

Drinking alcohol can increase some of the side effects of Paxil. This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

See also: Paxil and alcohol (in more detail)
Paxil side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Paxil: skin rash or hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

*

  unusual bone pain or tenderness, swelling or bruising;
*

  easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), coughing up blood;
*

  agitation, hallucinations, fever, fast heart rate, overactive reflexes, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, feeling unsteady, loss of coordination, fainting;
*

  very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, overactive reflexes, feeling like you might pass out;
*

  headache, trouble concentrating, memory problems, weakness, confusion, hallucinations, fainting, seizure, shallow breathing or breathing that stops; or
*

  severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious Paxil side effects may include:

*

  mild headache, drowsiness, dizziness, sleep problems (insomnia), feeling restless or nervous;
*

  mild nausea, constipation, weight changes;
*

  decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; or
*

  dry mouth, yawning, or ringing in your ears.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Paxil side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Paxil?

Cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by Paxil. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other antidepressant.

Ask your doctor before taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others. Taking an NSAID with Paxil may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Many drugs can interact with Paxil. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

*

  a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);
*

  cimetidine (Tagamet);
*

  fentanyl (Abstral, Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora, Onsolis);
*

  fosamprenavir (Lexiva) or ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra);
*

  St. John's wort;
*

  tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Soltamox);
*

  theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Theochron, Uniphyl);
*

  tramadol (Ultram, Ultracet);
*

  tryptophan (also called L-tryptophan);
*

  heart medication such as digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin), quinidine (Quin-G), procainamide (Pronestyl), disopyramide (Norpace), flecaininde (Tambocor), mexiletine (Mexitil), propafenone, (Rythmol), and others;
*

  any other antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip, Limbitrol), citalopram (Celexa), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), nortriptyline (Pamelor), sertraline (Zoloft), and others;
*

  medicine to treat psychiatric disorders, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), haloperidol (Haldol), lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith), perphenazine (Trilafon), or risperidone (Risperdal); or
*

  almotriptan (Axert), frovatriptan (Frova), sumatriptan (Imitrex, Treximet), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or zolmitriptan (Zomig).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Paxil. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy paracetamol online cheaply!

What is paracetamol ?

Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is a pain reliever and a fever reducer. The exact mechanism of action of is not known.

Paracetamol is used to treat many conditions such as headache, muscle aches, arthritis, backache, toothaches, colds, and fevers. It relieves pain in mild arthritis but has no effect on the underlying inflammation and swelling of the joint.

Paracetamol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about paracetamol

There are many brands and forms of paracetamol available and not all brands are listed on this leaflet.

Do not use more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of paracetamol can cause serious harm. The maximum amount of paracetamol for adults is 1 gram (1000 mg) per dose and 4 grams (4000 mg) per day. Taking more paracetamol could cause damage to your liver. If you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day, talk to your doctor before taking paracetamol and never use more than 2 grams (2000 mg) per day.
Video: Rheumatoid Arthritis
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Learn the signs of RA and how to relieve the pain.

Do not use this medication without first talking to your doctor if you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day or if you have had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis). You may not be able to use paracetamol .

Before using paracetamol , tell your doctor if you have liver disease or a history of alcoholism.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Paracetamol is contained in many combination medicines. If you use certain products together you may accidentally use too much paracetamol . Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains paracetamol, acetaminophen or APAP. Avoid drinking alcohol while taking this medication. Alcohol may increase your risk of liver damage while taking paracetamol .
Before taking paracetamol

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen or paracetamol.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take paracetamol if you have:

* liver disease; or
*

  a history of alcoholism;

It is not known whether paracetamol will harm an unborn baby. Before using paracetamol , tell your doctor if you are pregnant. This medication can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use paracetamol without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
How should I use paracetamol ?

Use paracetamol exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor.

Do not use more of this medication than is recommended. An overdose of paracetamol can cause serious harm. The maximum amount for adults is 1 gram (1000 mg) per dose and 4 grams (4000 mg) per day. Using more paracetamol could cause damage to your liver. If you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day, talk to your doctor before taking paracetamol and never use more than 2 grams (2000 mg) per day. If you are treating a child, use a pediatric form of paracetamol . Carefully follow the dosing directions on the medicine label. Do not give the medication to a child younger than 2 years old without the advice of a doctor.

Measure the liquid form of paracetamol with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. You may need to shake the liquid before each use. Follow the directions on the medicine label.

The paracetamol chewable tablet must be chewed thoroughly before you swallow it.

Make sure your hands are dry when handling the paracetamol disintegrating tablet. Place the tablet on your tongue. It will begin to dissolve right away. Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing.

To use the paracetamol effervescent granules, dissolve one packet of the granules in at least 4 ounces of water. Stir this mixture and drink all of it right away. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Do not take a paracetamol rectal suppository by mouth. It is for use only in your rectum. Wash your hands before and after inserting the suppository.

Try to empty your bowel and bladder just before using the paracetamol suppository. Remove the outer wrapper from the suppository before inserting it. Avoid handling the suppository too long or it will melt in your hands.

For best results from the suppository, lie down and insert the suppository pointed tip first into the rectum. Hold in the suppository for a few minutes. It will melt quickly once inserted and you should feel little or no discomfort while holding it in. Avoid using the bathroom just after inserting the suppository.

Stop using paracetamol and call your doctor if:

*

  you still have a fever after 3 days of use;
*

  you still have pain after 7 days of use (or 5 days if treating a child);
*

  you have a skin rash, ongoing headache, or any redness or swelling; or
*

  if your symptoms get worse, or if you have any new symptoms.

Urine glucose tests may produce false results while you are taking paracetamol . Talk to your doctor if you are diabetic and you notice changes in your glucose levels during treatment.

Store paracetamol at room temperature away from heat and moisture. The rectal suppositories can be stored at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Since paracetamol is often used only when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and use your next dose as directed. Do not use extra medicine to make up for a missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

The first signs of an paracetamol overdose include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, sweating, and confusion or weakness. Later symptoms may include pain in your upper stomach, dark urine, and yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.
What should I avoid while taking paracetamol ?

Do not use any other over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Paracetamol is contained in many combination medicines. If you use certain products together you may accidentally use too much paracetamol . Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains paracetamol, acetaminophen or APAP. Avoid drinking alcohol while taking this medication. Alcohol may increase your risk of liver damage while taking paracetamol .

See also: Paracetamol and alcohol (in more detail)
Paracetamol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to paracetamol: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

*

  low fever with nausea, stomach pain, and loss of appetite;
*

  dark urine, clay-colored stools; or
*

  jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

This is not a complete list of paracetamol side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Paracetamol side effects (in more detail)
Paracetamol Dosing Information

Usual Adult Paracetamol Dose for Fever:

General Dosing Guidelines: 325 to 650 mg every 4 to 6 hours or 1000 mg every 6 to 8 hours orally or rectally.

Paracetamol 500mg tablets: Two 500 mg tablets orally every 4 to 6 hours

Usual Adult Paracetamol Dose for Pain:

General Dosing Guidelines: 325 to 650 mg every 4 to 6 hours or 1000 mg every 6 to 8 hours orally or rectally.

Paracetamol 500mg tablets: Two 500 mg tablets orally every 4 to 6 hours

Usual Pediatric Dose for Fever:

Oral or Rectal:

<=1 month: 10 to 15 mg/kg/dose every 6 to 8 hours as needed.

1 month to 12 years: 10 to 15 mg/kg/dose every 4 to 6 hours as needed (Maximum: 5 doses in 24 hours)

Fever: 4 months to 9 years: Initial Dose: 30 mg/kg (Reported by one study (n=121) to be more effective in reducing fever than a 15 mg/kg maintenance dose with no difference regarding clinical tolerance.)

=12 years: 325 to 650 mg every 4 to 6 hours or 1000 mg every 6 to 8 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pain:

Oral or Rectal:

<=1 month: 10 to 15 mg/kg/dose every 6 to 8 hours as needed.

1 month to 12 years: 10 to 15 mg/kg/dose every 4 to 6 hours as needed (Maximum: 5 doses in 24 hours)

Fever: 4 months to 9 years: Initial Dose: 30 mg/kg (Reported by one study (n=121) to be more effective in reducing fever than a 15 mg/kg maintenance dose with no difference regarding clinical tolerance.)

=12 years: 325 to 650 mg every 4 to 6 hours or 1000 mg every 6 to 8 hours.
What other drugs will affect paracetamol ?

There may be other drugs that can interact with paracetamol . Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy ovral online cheaply!

What is Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?

Ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel contains a combination of female hormones that prevent ovulation (the release of an egg from an ovary). This medication also causes changes in your cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus and harder for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus.

Ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel is used as contraception to prevent pregnancy.

Ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?
Do not use birth control pills if you are pregnant or if you have recently had a baby. Do not use this medication if you have any of the following conditions: a history of stroke or blood clot, circulation problems (especially if caused by diabetes), a hormone-related cancer such as breast or uterine cancer, abnormal vaginal bleeding, liver disease or liver cancer, severe high blood pressure, migraine headaches, a heart valve disorder, or a history of jaundice caused by birth control pills.

You may need to use back-up birth control, such as condoms or a spermicide, when you first start using this medication. Follow your doctor’s instructions.
Taking hormones can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack, especially if you smoke and are older than 35.

Some drugs can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, including vitamins, minerals and herbal products. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?
This medication can cause birth defects. Do not use if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant, or if you miss two menstrual periods in a row. If you have recently had a baby, wait at least 4 weeks before taking birth control pills (6 weeks if you are breast-feeding). Do not use this medication if you have:

a history of a stroke or blood clot;

circulation problems (especially if caused by diabetes);

a hormone-related cancer such as breast or uterine cancer;

abnormal vaginal bleeding;

liver disease or liver cancer;

severe high blood pressure;

severe migraine headaches;

a heart valve disorder; or

a history of jaundice caused by birth control pills.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have any of the following conditions. You may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take birth control pills.

high blood pressure, heart disease, congestive heart failure, angina (chest pain), or a history of heart attack;

high cholesterol or if you are overweight;

a history of depression;

gallbladder disease;

diabetes;

seizures or epilepsy;

a history of irregular menstrual cycles; or

a history of fibrocystic breast disease, lumps, nodules, or an abnormal mammogram.

The hormones in birth control pills can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. This medication may also slow breast milk production. Do not use if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. You will take your first pill on the first day of your period or on the first Sunday after your period begins (follow your doctor’s instructions).

You may need to use back-up birth control, such as condoms or a spermicide, when you first start using this medication. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

The 28-day birth control pack contains seven “reminder” pills to keep you on your regular cycle. Your period will usually begin while you are using these reminder pills.
You may have breakthrough bleeding, especially during the first 3 months. Tell your doctor if this bleeding continues or is very heavy.

Take one pill every day, no more than 24 hours apart. When the pills run out, start a new pack the following day. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of pills completely.

If you need to have any type of medical tests or surgery, or if you will be on bed rest, you may need to stop using this medication for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are using birth control pills.

Your doctor will need to see you on a regular basis while you are using this medication. Do not miss any appointments.
Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Missing a pill increases your risk of becoming pregnant.

If you miss one “active” pill, take two pills on the day that you remember. Then take one pill per day for the rest of the pack.

If you miss two “active” pills in a row in week one or two, take two pills per day for two days in a row. Then take one pill per day for the rest of the pack. Use back-up birth control for at least 7 days following the missed pills.

If you miss two “active” pills in a row in week three, or if you miss three pills in a row during any of the first 3 weeks, throw out the rest of the pack and start a new one the same day if you are a Day 1 starter. If you are a Sunday starter, keep taking a pill every day until Sunday. On Sunday, throw out the rest of the pack and start a new one that day.

If you miss three “active” pills in a row during any of the first 3 weeks, throw out the rest of the pack and start a new pack on the same day if you are a Day 1 starter. If you are a Sunday starter, keep taking a pill every day until Sunday. On Sunday, throw out the rest of the pack and start a new one that day.
If you miss two or more pills, you may not have a period during the month. If you miss a period for two months in a row, call your doctor because you might be pregnant.

If you miss any reminder pills, throw them away and keep taking one pill per day until the pack is empty. You do not need back-up birth control if you miss a reminder pill.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?
Do not smoke while using birth control pills, especially if you are older than 35. Smoking can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack caused by birth control pills.

Birth control pills will not protect you from sexually transmitted diseases–including HIV and AIDS. Using a condom is the only way to protect yourself from these diseases.

Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel) side effects
Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

a change in the pattern or severity of migraine headaches;

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

a breast lump; or

symptoms of depression (sleep problems, weakness, mood changes).

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps;

breast pain, tenderness, or swelling;

freckles or darkening of facial skin;

increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair;

changes in weight or appetite;

problems with contact lenses;

vaginal itching or discharge;

changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or

nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect.

See also: Ovral side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?

Some drugs can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using birth control pills, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C);

phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin);

modafinil (Provigil);

dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol);

an antibiotic;

seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others;

a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or

HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can affect birth control pills. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.