How to buy Aciphex online cheaply!

What is AcipHex?

AcipHex (rabeprazole) is a proton pump inhibitor that decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

AcipHex is used short-term to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults and children who are at least 1 year old.

AcipHex is used only in adults to treat conditions involving excessive stomach acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Rabeprazole is also used in adults to promote healing of duodenal ulcers or erosive esophagitis (damage to your esophagus caused by stomach acid).

AcipHex may also be given with an antibiotic to prevent duodenal ulcer caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).

This medicine is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

GERD and Heartburn: What Is GERD?
SLIDESHOW
GERD and Heartburn: What Is GERD?
Important information
You should not use AcipHex if you are allergic to rabeprazole or to similar medicines such as lansoprazole (Prevacid), esomeprazole (Nexium), omeprazole (Prilosec, Zegerid), or pantoprazole (Protonix). AcipHex is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of AcipHex and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Rabeprazole can cause kidney problems, an intestinal infection, or lupus (an autoimmune disorder).

Call your doctor right away if you have new or worsening joint pain, a skin rash that gets worse in sunlight, severe stomach pain, watery or bloody diarrhea, blood in your urine, or little or no urination.

Taking AcipHex may increase your risk of bone fracture in the hip, wrist, or spine, especially if you take the medicine long term or more than once per day.

Before taking this medicine
Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

You should not use AcipHex if you are allergic to rabeprazole or:

if you also take any medicine that contains rilpivirine, such as Edurant or Complera; or

if you also allergic to medicines like rabeprazole, such as esomeprazole (Nexium), lansoprazole (Prevacid), omeprazole (Prilosec, Zegerid), or pantoprazole (Protonix).

To make sure AcipHex is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

liver disease;

osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (osteopenia);

lupus (an autoimmune disorder); or

low levels of magnesium in your blood.

Taking a proton pump inhibitor such as AcipHex may increase your risk of bone fracture in the hip, wrist, or spine. This effect has occurred mostly in people who have taken the medicine long term or more than once per day, and in those who are age 50 and older. It is not clear whether AcipHex is the actual cause of an increased risk of fracture.

It is not known whether AcipHex will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether rabeprazole passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take AcipHex?
AcipHex is usually taken once per day. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

AcipHex is for short-term use only, usually 4 to 8 weeks. Your doctor may recommend a second course of treatment if you need additional healing time.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice. Certain forms and strengths of rabeprazole should not be given to a child younger than 12 years old.

AcipHex Sprinkle should not be given to a child younger than 1 year old.

When treating H. pylori infection, AcipHex may be needed for only 7 days. Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

If you take AcipHex to treat duodenal ulcers, take the medicine after a meal. If you take AcipHex to prevent ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori, take the medicine with food. If you take this medicine for any other condition, you may take rabeprazole with or without food.

AcipHex Sprinkle delayed-release capsules should be taken 30 minutes before a meal.

Do not crush, break, or chew the tablet form of this medicine. Swallow the tablet whole.

To take AcipHex Sprinkle, open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of soft food such as applesauce, yogurt, or baby food made from fruit or vegetable. You may also mix the medicine with apple juice, Pedialyte, or infant formula. Swallow right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use; it will go bad after 15 minutes.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of rabeprazole and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Take your medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before your condition is completely cleared.

Rabeprazole can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse while using AcipHex.

If you use AcipHex for longer than 3 years, you could develop a vitamin B-12 deficiency. Talk to your doctor about how to manage this condition if you develop it.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Dosage Information (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?
Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?
Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking AcipHex?
This medicine can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Rabeprazole side effects
Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to AcipHex: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

severe stomach pain, diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

sudden pain or trouble moving your hip, wrist, or back;

seizure (convulsions);

kidney problems – urinating less than usual, blood in your urine, swelling, rapid weight gain;

symptoms of lupus – new or worsening joint pain, skin rash on your cheeks and arms (worsens in sunlight);

symptoms of low magnesium – dizziness, irregular heart rate, feeling jittery, muscle pain or weakness, muscle spasms in your hands and feet, choking feeling, hoarse voice, seizure;

symptoms of low vitamin B – pale skin, tiredness, muscle weakness, irregular heartbeats, feeling light-headed or short of breath; or

signs of bleeding (if you also take warfarin) – headaches, dizziness, weakness; pain or swelling; bruising, unusual bleeding, nosebleeds, bleeding gums); red or pink urine; heavy menstrual flow; bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; or any bleeding that will not stop.

Common AcipHex side effects may include:

headache;

sore throat;

diarrhea, constipation; or

stomach pain, gas, nausea, vomiting.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs will affect AcipHex?
Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo,Trexall); or

warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with rabeprazole, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Aciphex Side Effects
In Summary
Common side effects of Aciphex include: atrophic gastritis. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer
Applies to rabeprazole: oral capsule delayed release, oral tablet enteric coated

Along with its needed effects, rabeprazole (the active ingredient contained in Aciphex) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking rabeprazole:

Less common
Bloating or swelling of the face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet
cough or hoarseness
dark urine
dry mouth
fever or chills
general tiredness and weakness
light-colored stools
lower back or side pain
nausea and vomiting
painful or difficult urination
rapid weight gain
tingling of the hands or feet
unusual weight gain or loss
yellow eyes and skin
Rare
Bloody urine
continuing ulcers or sores in the mouth
convulsions (seizures)
difficulty with breathing
sore throat
unusual bleeding or bruising
unusual tiredness or weakness
Incidence not known
Back, leg, or stomach pains
bleeding gums
blood in the urine or stools
bloody, black, or tarry stools
change in consciousness
clay-colored stools
cloudy urine
confusion about identity, place, person, and time
continuing nausea or vomiting
difficulty with swallowing
dizziness
drowsiness
fast heartbeat
general body swelling
general feeling of tiredness or weakness
greatly decreased frequency of urination or amount of urine
headache
high fever
hives, itching, or skin rash
holding false beliefs that cannot be changed by fact
increase in the frequency of seizures
joint or muscle pain
large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
loss of appetite
loss of consciousness
mood or mental changes
muscle cramps
muscle pain or stiffness
muscle spasms (tetany) or twitching
no blood pressure
no breathing
no pulse
nosebleeds
pale skin
pinpoint red spots on the skin
puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there
skin blisters
sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
swollen glands
tightness in the chest
trembling
unpleasant breath odor
unusual excitement, nervousness, or restlessness
vomiting of blood

Some side effects of rabeprazole may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
Bad, unusual, or unpleasant (after) taste
change in taste
Less common
Body aches or pain
congestion
constipation
diarrhea
excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
feeling weak
full feeling
heartburn
numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness in the hands or feet
pain
passing gas
runny nose
sleepiness
swollen joints
tender, swollen glands in the neck
voice changes
Incidence not known
Blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
red, irritated eyes
red skin lesions, often with a purple center
For Healthcare Professionals
Applies to rabeprazole: oral delayed release capsule, oral delayed release tablet, oral tablet extended release

General
The most commonly reported side effects are headache, diarrhea, and abdominal pain.[Ref]

Gastrointestinal
Very common (10% or more): Diarrhea (up to 21%), abdominal pain (up to 16%), vomiting (up to 14%)
Common (1% to 10%): Nausea, constipation, flatulence, benign fundic gland polyps
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dyspepsia, dry mouth, eructation
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Gastritis, stomatitis
Postmarketing reports: Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea[Ref]

Other
Common (1% to 10%): Infection, non-specific pain, influenza-like illness, asthenia
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Chills, pyrexia/fever
Postmarketing reports: Sudden death, facial swelling[Ref]

Respiratory
Common (1% to 10%): Cough, pharyngitis, rhinitis
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Bronchitis, sinusitis
Postmarketing reports: Dyspnea, interstitial pneumonia[Ref]

Nervous system
Common (1% to 10%): Headache, dizziness, taste disturbance/perversion
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Somnolence, hepatic encephalopathy
Postmarketing reports: Coma, vertigo[Ref]

Hepatic encephalopathy occurred in patients with underlying cirrhosis.[Ref]

Musculoskeletal
Common (1% to 10%): Back pain, myalgia
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Leg cramps, arthralgia, fracture of hip/wrist/spine
Postmarketing reports: Rhabdomyolysis, bone fractures[Ref]

Dermatologic
Common (1% to 10%): Rash
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Erythema
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Pruritus, sweating, bullous reactions
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), Stevens-Johnson syndrome
Frequency not reported: Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus
Postmarketing reports: Urticarial skin eruptions, other drug eruptions, severe dermatological reactions, systemic lupus erythematosus, fatal TEN[Ref]

Erythema and bullous reactions usually resolved after discontinuation.[Ref]

Psychiatric
Common (1% to 10%): Insomnia
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Nervousness
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Depression
Frequency not reported: Confusion
Postmarketing reports: Disorientation, delirium[Ref]

Cardiovascular
Common (1% to 10%): Chest pain
Frequency not reported: Peripheral edema
Postmarketing reports: Hypotension[Ref]

Hepatic
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Increased hepatic enzymes
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Hepatitis, jaundice[Ref]

Increased hepatic enzymes occurred in patients with underlying cirrhosis.[Ref]

Genitourinary
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Urinary tract infection[Ref]

Hematologic
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Neutropenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis
Postmarketing reports: Pancytopenia, agranulocytosis, bicytopenia, hemolytic anemia, increase in prothrombin time/INR[Ref]

Increased prothrombin time/INR occurred in patients taking warfarin concomitantly.[Ref]

Metabolic
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Anorexia, weight gain
Frequency not reported: Hypomagnesemia, hyponatremia
Postmarketing reports: Hyperammonemia[Ref]

Renal
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Interstitial nephritis[Ref]

Ocular
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Visual disturbance
Postmarketing reports: Blurred vision[Ref]

Endocrine
Frequency not reported: Gynecomastia
Postmarketing reports: TSH elevations[Ref]

Hypersensitivity
Hypersensitivity reactions included facial swelling, hypotension, dyspnea, erythema, and bullous reactions; these reactions typically resolved after discontinuation.[Ref]

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Hypersensitivity
Postmarketing reports: Acute systemic allergic reactions, anaphylaxis/anaphylactic reactions, angioedema[Ref]

References

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0
  2. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0
  3. “Product Information. Aciphex (rabeprazole)” Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ.

Some side effects of Aciphex may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

How to buy Aceon online cheaply!

What is Aceon?

Aceon (perindopril) is an ACE inhibitor. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme.

Aceon is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) and to prevent heart attack in people with coronary artery disease.

Aceon may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Seasoned Pro: Be Mindful of These Winter Health Hazards
SLIDESHOW
Seasoned Pro: Be Mindful of These Winter Health Hazards
Important information
Do not use Aceon if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor right away.

You should not use this medicine if you have hereditary angioedema.

If you have diabetes, do not use Aceon together with any medication that contains aliskiren (such as Amturnide, Tekturna, Tekamlo).

Before taking this medicine
You should not use Aceon if you are allergic to perindopril or if:

you have hereditary angioedema; or

you are allergic to any other ACE inhibitor, such as benazepril, captopril, enalapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, moexipril, quinapril, ramipril, or trandolapril.

You may also need to avoid taking Aceon with aliskiren if you have kidney disease.

You should not use Aceon if you have hereditary angioedema.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

liver disease;

heart disease or congestive heart failure;

diabetes; or

a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren’s syndrome, lupus, scleroderma, or rheumatoid arthritis.

Do not use Aceon if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor right away. Perindopril can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester.

It is not known whether perindopril passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Aceon?
Take Aceon exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take each dose with a full glass of water. Drink plenty of liquids while you are taking Aceon.

Aceon can be taken with or without food.

Call your doctor if you have ongoing vomiting or diarrhea, or if you are sweating more than usual. You can easily become dehydrated while taking Aceon. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be checked.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using Aceon. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Aceon dosing information
Usual Adult Dose for Coronary Artery Disease:

Initial dose: 4 mg orally once a day for 2 weeks, then increase to maintenance dose as tolerated.
Maintenance dose: 8 mg orally once a day

Use: Treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease to reduce the risk of cardiovascular mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarction.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 4 mg orally once a day
Maintenance dose: 4 to 8 mg orally per day in 1 or 2 divided doses
Maximum dose: 16 mg/day

Comments: In patients treated with a diuretic, consider reducing the diuretic dose prior to starting this drug.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Coronary Artery Disease:

Greater than 70 Years:
Initial dose:
-Week 1: 2 mg orally once a day
-Week 2: 4 mg orally once a day, then increase to maintenance dose as tolerated.
Maintenance dose: 8 mg orally once a day

Use: Treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease to reduce the risk of cardiovascular mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarction.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 4 mg orally per day in 1 or 2 divided doses

Comments: Experience with doses above 8 mg is limited; administer with careful blood pressure monitoring and dose titration.

See also: Dosage Information (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?
Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?
Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include feeling extremely dizzy or light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking Aceon?
Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking Aceon, unless your doctor has told you to.

Aceon side effects
Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Aceon: hives; severe stomach pain, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores in your mouth and throat;

little or no urination;

swelling, rapid weight gain;

high potassium–nausea, slow or unusual heart rate, weakness, loss of movement;

pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding; or

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Common Aceon side effects may include:

dizziness;

back pain; or

cough.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs will affect Aceon?
Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

gold injections to treat arthritis;

lithium;

NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)–aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others;

a potassium supplement;

salt substitutes that contain potassium; or

a diuretic or “water pill.”

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with perindopril, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.
Aceon Side Effects
In Summary
Common side effects of Aceon include: cough. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer
Applies to perindopril: oral tablet

Along with its needed effects, perindopril (the active ingredient contained in Aceon) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking perindopril:

More common
Body aches or pain
chills
cough
difficulty breathing
ear congestion
fever
headache
loss of voice
nasal congestion
runny nose
sneezing
sore throat
unusual tiredness or weakness
Less common
Abdominal or stomach pain
bladder pain
bloody or cloudy urine
change in hearing
chest pain
cold or flu-like symptoms
congestion
difficult, burning, or painful urination
dryness of the throat
earache or pain in the ear
ear drainage
frequent urge to urinate
hoarseness
lower back or side pain
swelling
tender, swollen glands in the neck
trouble with swallowing
voice changes
vomiting
Rare
Blurred vision
confusion
decreased urination
dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
dry mouth
irregular heartbeat
muscle cramps or pain
numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness in the hands or feet
rapid breathing
seizures
sunken eyes
sweating
thirst
trembling
weakness and heaviness of the legs

Some side effects of perindopril may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
Back pain
lack or loss of strength
pain or tenderness around the eyes and cheekbones
tightness of the chest
Less common
Belching
bloated
burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, “pins and needles”, or tingling feelings
diarrhea
difficulty moving
discouragement
excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
feeling sad or empty
full feeling
hearing loss
injury
irritability
lack of appetite
leg pain
loss of interest or pleasure
muscle aching, stiffness, tension, or tightness
nausea
neck pain
nervousness
pain, swelling, or redness in the joints
passing gas
rash
sleepiness or unusual drowsiness
stomach discomfort or upset
swollen joints
trouble concentrating
trouble sleeping
For Healthcare Professionals
Applies to perindopril: oral tablet

General
The most common adverse events were cough, dizziness, and back pain.[Ref]

Respiratory
Very common (10% or more): Cough (up to 12%)
Common (1% to 10%): Dyspnea, epistaxis
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Bronchospasm
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Eosinophilic pneumonia, rhinitis[Ref]

Nervous system
Common (1% to 10%): Dizziness, headache, paresthesia, vertigo, tinnitus, dysgeusia, drowsiness
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Somnolence, syncope
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Stroke[Ref]

Gastrointestinal
Common (1% to 10%): Abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dry mouth
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Pancreatitis
Postmarketing reports: Acute pancreatitis[Ref]

Cardiovascular
Common (1% to 10%): Hypotension, palpitations, vasculitis, flushing, impaired peripheral circulation
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Tachycardia
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Sudden cardiac arrest
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Angina pectoris, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction[Ref]

Dermatologic
Common (1% to 10%): Pruritus, rash
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Urticaria, angioedema, photosensitivity reactions, pemphigoid, hyperhidrosis, eczema, sweating
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Erythema multiforme
Postmarketing reports: Bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus, psoriasis, exfoliative dermatitis[Ref]

Other
Common (1% to 10%): Asthenia, discomfort on exertion
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Chest pain, malaise, edema peripheral, pyrexia, fall, atypical chest pain
Postmarketing reports: Serositis[Ref]

Musculoskeletal
Common (1% to 10%): Muscle cramps, back pain
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Arthralgia, myalgia[Ref]

Hepatic
Common (1% to 10%): ALT increased
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): AST increased
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Blood bilirubin increased, hepatic enzyme increased
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Hepatitis
Postmarketing reports: Hepatic failure, jaundice[Ref]

Ocular
Common (1% to 10%): Visual disturbances[Ref]

Renal
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Renal insufficiency, blood urea increased, blood creatinine increased
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Acute renal failure
Postmarketing reports: Nephritis[Ref]

Metabolic
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hypoglycemia, hyperkalemia, hyponatremia
Postmarketing reports: Symptomatic hyponatremia[Ref]

Hematologic
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Eosinophilia, leukopenia/neutropenia
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Agranulocytosis or pancytopenia, hemoglobin decreased and hematocrit decreased, hemolytic anemia in patients with a congenital deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, thrombocytopenia, unexplained change in prothrombin ratio
Postmarketing reports: Anemia, leukocytosis, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate[Ref]

Psychiatric
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Mood disturbances, sleep disorder
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Confusion, depression, hallucinations[Ref]

Genitourinary
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Erectile dysfunction[Ref]

Immunologic
Postmarketing reports: Positive antinuclear antibody[Ref]

References

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0
  2. “Product Information. Aceon (perindopril).” Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc, Marietta, GA.
  3. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0
    Some side effects of Aceon may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

How to buy Accupril online cheaply!

What is Accupril?

Accupril (quinapril) is an ACE inhibitor. ACE stands for angiotensin converting enzyme.

Accupril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) and heart failure.

Accupril may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Seasoned Pro: Be Mindful of These Winter Health Hazards
SLIDESHOW
Seasoned Pro: Be Mindful of These Winter Health Hazards
Important information
Do not use Accupril if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor right away.

You should not use quinaprilif you have ever had angioedema. Do not take Accupril within 36 hours before or after taking medicine that contains sacubatril (such as Entresto).

If you have diabetes, do not use Accupril together with any medication that contains aliskiren (such as Tekturna or Tekamlo).

Before taking this medicine
You should not use Accupril if you are allergic to quinapril, or if:

you have a history of angioedema;

you recently took a heart medicine called sacubatril; or

if you are allergic to any other ACE inhibitor, such as benazepril, captopril, enalapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, moexipril, perindopril, ramipril, or trandolapril.

Do not take Accupril within 36 hours before or after taking medicine that contains sacubatril (such as Entresto).

If you have diabetes, do not use Accupril together with any medication that contains aliskiren (such as Tekturna or Tekamlo).

You may also need to avoid taking quinapril with aliskiren if you have kidney disease.

To make sure Accupril is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);

liver disease;

a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome, Sjogren’s syndrome, lupus, scleroderma, or rheumatoid arthritis;

heart disease or congestive heart failure (unless you are taking quinapril for this condition); or

if you are on a low-salt diet.

Do not use if you are pregnant. If you become pregnant, stop taking this medicine and tell your doctor right away. Accupril can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester.

Quinapril can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Accupril?
Take Accupril exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested.

Call your doctor if you have ongoing vomiting or diarrhea, or if you are sweating more than usual. You can easily become dehydrated while taking Accupril. This can lead to very low blood pressure, electrolyte disorders, or kidney failure.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using Accupril. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medicine even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medicine for the rest of your life.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Accupril dosing information
Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 10 or 20 mg orally once a day in patients not on diuretics
Maintenance dose: 20 to 80 mg orally per day, administered as a single dose or in two equally divided doses

Use:
-Treatment of hypertension

Usual Adult Dose for Congestive Heart Failure:

Initial dose: 5 mg orally twice a day
Maintenance dose: 20 to 40 mg orally per day administered in two equally divided doses

Comments:
-This dose may improve symptoms of heart failure, but increases in exercise duration have generally required higher doses.
-If the initial dosage is well tolerated, patients should then be titrated at weekly intervals until an effective dose.

Use:
-Management of heart failure as adjunctive therapy when added to conventional therapy including diuretics and/or digitalis

Usual Geriatric Dose for Congestive Heart Failure:

10 mg orally once a day

Comments: Dose should be titrated the same way as for other adult patients.

Uses:
-Treatment of hypertension
-Management of heart failure as adjunctive therapy when added to conventional therapy including diuretics and/or digitalis

Usual Geriatric Dose for Hypertension:

10 mg orally once a day

Comments: Dose should be titrated the same way as for other adult patients.

Uses:
-Treatment of hypertension
-Management of heart failure as adjunctive therapy when added to conventional therapy including diuretics and/or digitalis

See also: Dosage Information (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?
Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?
Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Accupril?
Do not use salt substitutes or potassium supplements while taking Accupril, unless your doctor has told you to.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of quinapril.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Accupril side effects
Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Accupril: hives; severe stomach pain; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

fast or pounding heartbeats, fluttering in your chest;

little or no urination;

pain or burning when you urinate;

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

numbness, tingling, or burning pain in your hands or feet;

fever, chills, cold or flu symptoms;

high potassium – nausea, slow or unusual heart rate, weakness, loss of movement; or

low sodium – headache, confusion, slurred speech, severe weakness, vomiting, loss of coordination, feeling unsteady.

Common Accupril side effects may include:

headache;

cough; or

dizziness, tired feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs will affect Accupril?
Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

lithium;

a diuretic or “water pill”;

gold injections to treat arthritis; or

NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) – aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with quinapril, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.
Accupril Side Effects
In Summary
More frequent side effects include: cough. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer
Applies to quinapril: oral tablet

Along with its needed effects, quinapril (the active ingredient contained in Accupril) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking quinapril:

Less common
Blurred vision
chest pain
confusion
diarrhea
difficult or labored breathing
dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
nausea
stomach pain
sweating
tightness in the chest
unusual tiredness or weakness
vomiting
Rare
Bleeding gums
cold, clammy skin
enlarged pupils
fast or slow heartbeat
increased sensitivity of the skin or eyes to sunlight
stiff or sore neck
Some side effects of quinapril may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
Headache
Less common
Back pain
coughing
difficulty with moving
joint pain
muscle aching or cramping
muscle pains or stiffness
rash
swollen joints
For Healthcare Professionals
Applies to quinapril: oral tablet

General
The most commonly reported side effects were dizziness, increased serum creatinine, increased blood urea nitrogen, cough, dyspnea, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.[Ref]

Cardiovascular
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Chest pain, hypotension, palpitations, vasodilation, tachycardia, heart failure, myocardial infarction, hypertensive crisis, angina pectoris, orthostatic hypotension, cardiac rhythm disturbances, cardiogenic shock[Ref]

Renal
Common (1% to 10%): Increased serum creatinine, increased blood urea nitrogen
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Urinary tract infection, acute renal failure/dysfunction, worsening renal failure, proteinuria
Frequency not reported: Increases in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine[Ref]

Metabolic
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hyperkalemia, hyponatremia[Ref]

Hematologic
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hemolytic anemia, agranulocytosis, thrombocytopenia
Frequency not reported: Neutropenia, decreased hemoglobin, decreased hematocrit[Ref]

Hypersensitivity
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Angioedema of the head, neck, face, extremities, lips, tongue, glottis and/or larynx, intestines; anaphylactoid reactions[Ref]

Hepatic
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Abnormal liver function tests, hepatitis
Rare (less than 0.1%): Hepatic failure (characterized by cholestatic jaundice with progression to fulminant hepatic necrosis and sometimes death)
Frequency not reported: Cholestatic icterus[Ref]

Nervous system
Common (1% to 10%): Dizziness
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Headache, cerebrovascular accident/cerebral hemorrhage, somnolence, vertigo, syncope, nervousness, paresthesia, transient ischemic attacks, tinnitus
Rare (less than 0.1%): Balance disorder[Ref]

Gastrointestinal
Common (1% to 10%): Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dyspepsia, abdominal pain
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Flatulence, dry mouth or throat, constipation, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, pancreatitis
Rare (less than 0.1%): Glossitis
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Ileus[Ref]

Respiratory
Common (1% to 10%): Cough, pharyngitis, dyspnea, rhinitis
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Eosinophilic pneumonitis, sinusitis, upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis
Frequency not reported: Bronchospasm[Ref]

Musculoskeletal
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Myalgia, back pain, arthralgia

Genitourinary
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Impotence[Ref]

Psychiatric
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Depression, insomnia, confusion[Ref]

Other
Common (1% to 10%): Fatigue, asthenia
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Fever, malaise, generalized/peripheral edema[Ref]

Immunologic
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Viral infection[Ref]

Dermatologic
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Rash, alopecia, increased sweating, pemphigus, pruritus, exfoliative dermatitis, photosensitivity reaction, dermatopolymyositis
Rare (less than 0.1%): Urticaria, erythema multiforme, pemphigus
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Psoriasis-like efflorescence
Frequency not reported: Stevens Johnson syndrome, epidermal necrolysis[Ref]
Ocular
Uncommon (0.1% to 1): Amblyopia
Very rare (less than 0.01%): Blurred vision[Ref]

References

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0
  2. “Product Information. Accupril (quinapril).” Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  3. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0
    Some side effects of Accupril may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

How to buy Abana online cheaply!

Abana is an herbal formula that helps reduce the sensitivity of the heart to adrenergic stimulation. Because it can increase the contractility of the heart by exerting a positive inotropic action, it is well-known for being a safe and effective cardioprotective. It aids in the prevention of cardiac neurosis.

Abana is composed of arjuna, calmint, gulnchatinospora, Indian gooseberry, chebulic myrobalan, thistles, licorice, asparagus, spreading hogweed, mineral pitch, Indian bedellium, Indian pennywort, bind weed, holy basil, musk root, Indian long pepper, Bishop’s weed, Calx serpentine, nut grass, clove, staff tree, white sandalwood, cardamom, fennel, Persian rose, cinnamomum, biotite calx, processed pearl, processed agate, processed ruby and saffron.

Two of Abana’s ingredients, processed ruby and jade, are known for allaying the palpitation of he heart and have been used as a tonic. Processed agate, on the other hand, contains a component called Rasna which is actually used to treat rheumatism and arthritis because of its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties.

Processed pearl, one of its ingredients, is made of biotite calx which is prepared by treating biotite or mica with juices from a number of plants and is deemed to be a very effective cellular regenerator. It can also aid in treating respiratory tract infections and anemia because it has traces of iron, calcium, potassium, magnesium and aluminum.

Calx surpentine, another component of Abana, is made of processed magnesium silicate which is known for decreasing palpitations and increasing cardio-muscular strength. At the same, it is also known for relieving muscle cramps and reducing irritability and anxiousness.

Abana also contains calmint, an herb that has bluish-purple flowers, contains a high amount of triterpenoid aldehyde nephinal as well as other terpenoids which can be used to treat cardiovascular problems like angina pectoris, trachycardia and cardiac trombosis. This herb can also help in treating cardiac asthma and relieving pyrexia and anxiety. It also contains a spice called saffron which is known to have a lot of medicinal properties. Not only is it used as a nerve sedative and emmenagogue, it is also used for treating melancholia and fevers.

Another component of Abana that has been used for natural remedies is the arjuna bark. This substance is used by people with hypertension and ischemic diseases because of its anti-ischemic and cardioprotective properties. It has been used to treat irregular and disturbed cardiac rhythm as well as myocardial infarction.

Although it doesn’t have any side effects and is sold over the counter, you should consult your doctor before you use this medication. He will provide you with the proper dosage for your condition. Most patients drink two to three tablets twice a day with warm water. Even though, you’ve missed a dose of this medicine, you shouldn’t take two doses at one time. Just take the missed dose as soon as possible. Women who are pregnant or nursing should consult their physicians before taking this medicine.

How to buy Acai berry online cheaply!

What are the benefits of Acai?
The taste of Acai berries, once processed and powdered, is often described as a fruity red wine flavour with chocolate overtones. Within the nutritional pulp and skin, Acai berries are packed with antioxidants, amino acids, fibre, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals making it a near perfect energising fruit.

The popularity of Acai is primarily due to its very high concentration of antioxidants. Briefly, antioxidants are molecules that prevent the oxidation of other molecules. Oxidation produces free radicals which can damage the cells and glands within our bodies making us more prone to disease and ageing. Since our bodies are exposed to a variety of toxins and produce trillions of free radicals, it is important to take steps to reduce the effect of free radicals in the body. Having a diet rich in antioxidants is the first step and introducing Acai into your regime is another possible way of preventing free radical damage.

Acai has been recognised as one of the world’s highest ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorption Capacity) foods. ORAC is a measurement of how well antioxidants can neutralise free radicals. The higher the value, the better the body utilises it to fight free radicals. Acai has more than double the antioxidants of blueberries and nearly ten times that of grapes.

The antioxidants found in Acai berry, anthocyanins, are excellent for heart health. Heart disease is increasingly becoming a problem in the world and finding natural ways of keeping your cardiovascular system healthy is an excellent option. Additionally, anthocyanins are also good at preventing the oxidation of cholesterol. When circulating cholesterol, no matter whether you have high or low levels, gets oxidised, it sticks to the walls of arteries causing their narrowing. This build-up of plaque eventually leads to high blood pressure which is of course dangerous.

The fibre found in Acai berry skin and pulp can aid digestion. Fibre can help prevent or relieve constipation and may help support a healthy cardiovascular system.
Acai is naturally high in essential fatty acids having a fatty acid profile similar to olive oil. The link between essential fatty acids and heart health and a healthy nervous system is well documented.
Acai berries contain amino acids which help promote muscle performance, energy production, endurance and strength.
Acai berries contain as much Vitamin C as blueberries and is also a source of Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3 and E. It is also a source of calcium, magnesium, zinc and copper.
With such an amazing nutritional profile, it is not difficult to understand why Acai berries can be beneficial for your health and may help slow down the ageing process.

Why is there so much hype around Acai?
There is no doubt about the health benefits of Acai berries. Unfortunately when a product becomes very popular, unfortunately this can lead to misleading information and claims.

Firstly, the largest sector that Acai has been targeted to is weight loss. There are numerous sites that claim that taking Acai Berry in a liquid or capsule form will help to shed pounds. It is estimated that large numbers of the adult population at any given time are thinking of losing weight. Is it a surprise then that Acai has been targeted to this audience?

The truth is that Acai contributes to the overall health of the body, and should not be relied upon solely for weight loss. A healthy lifestyle including a variety of vegetables, quality protein and fruit coupled with some form of exercise will be of benefit. I am not dismissing that Acai can be of benefit, however it should not be relied solely for losing weight. Yes, antioxidants do help to neutralise the by-products of fat burning and thus ensure that the body can carry on burning fat. Acai’s fibre content will help to cleanse the colon and this is one of the steps in achieving weight loss since many of us have sluggish digestion.

Acai is expensive since the berries have to be freeze dried within 24 hours to keep their nutritional profile intact. Freeze drying preserves the goodness of Acai berries found in the skin and pulp and not in the juice.

Many products containing Acai use only a small amount of Acai and load the products with other fillers or juices.

There are many manufacturers who claim that Acai helps to cure arthritis, help depression and improve libido. Frankly, I am sceptical of these claims.

How to buy Abilify online cheaply!

What is Abilify?

Abilify (aripiprazole) is an antipsychotic medication. It works by changing the actions of chemicals in the brain.

Abilify is used to treat the symptoms of psychotic conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (manic depression). It is also used together with other medications to treat major depressive disorder in adults.

Abilify is also used to treat irritability and symptoms of aggression, mood swings, temper tantrums, and self-injury related to autistic disorder in children who are at least 6 years old.

Abilify may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Abilify

Abilify is not for use in psychotic conditions that are related to dementia. Abilify may cause heart failure, sudden death, or pneumonia in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

Stop using Abilify and call your doctor at once if you have the following symptoms: fever with stiff muscles and rapid heart rate; uncontrolled muscle movements; symptoms that come on suddenly such as numbness or weakness, severe headache, and problems with vision, speech, or balance. Abilify may impair your thinking or reactions.
Video: Treatment for Depression
Video preview

Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid drinking alcohol, which can increase some of the side effects of Abilify. Before you take this medicine, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by Abilify. Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated.

Drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather and during exercise. It is easier to become dangerously overheated and dehydrated while you are taking Abilify.
Before taking Abilify

Abilify is not for use in psychotic conditions that are related to dementia. Abilify may cause heart failure, sudden death, or pneumonia in older adults with dementia-related conditions. You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to aripiprazole.

To make sure you can safely take Abilify, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver or kidney disease;

heart disease, high blood pressure, heart rhythm problems;

high cholesterol or triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood);

a history of low white blood cell (WBC) counts;

a history of heart attack or stroke;

a history of breast cancer;

seizures or epilepsy;

a personal or family history of diabetes; or

trouble swallowing.

The liquid form (oral solution) of Abilify may contain up to 15 grams of sugar per dose. Before taking Abilify oral solution, tell your doctor if you have diabetes. The orally disintegrating tablet form of this medicine may contain over 3 milligrams of phenylalanine per tablet. Before taking Abilify Discmelt, tell your doctor if you have phenylketonuria.

Abilify may cause you to have high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Talk to your doctor if you have any signs of hyperglycemia such as increased thirst or urination, excessive hunger, or weakness. If you are diabetic, check your blood sugar levels on a regular basis while you are taking Abilify.

FDA pregnancy category C. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

See also: Abilify pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)

Taking antipsychotic medication during the last 3 months of pregnancy may cause problems in the newborn, such as withdrawal symptoms, breathing problems, feeding problems, fussiness, tremors, and limp or stiff muscles. However, you may have withdrawal symptoms or other problems if you stop taking your medicine during pregnancy. If you become pregnant while taking Abilify, do not stop taking it without your doctor’s advice.

Aripiprazole can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use Abilify without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
How should I take Abilify?

Take Abilify exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Do not take Abilify for longer than 6 weeks unless your doctor has told you to.

Abilify can be taken with or without food.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

To take aripiprazole orally disintegrating tablets (Abilify Discmelt):

Keep the tablet in its blister pack until you are ready to take it. Open the package and peel back the foil from the tablet blister. Do not push a tablet through the foil or you may damage the tablet.

Using dry hands, remove the tablet and place it in your mouth. It will begin to dissolve right away.

Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing.

Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves. If desired, you may drink liquid to help swallow the dissolved tablet.

Use Abilify regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Your doctor will need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Store Abilify tablets at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Abilify liquid should be stored in the refrigerator and can be used for up to 6 months after opening.

See also: Abilify dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, vomiting, agitation, aggression, confusion, tremors, fast or slow heart rate, seizure (convulsions), trouble breathing, or fainting.
What should I avoid while taking Abilify?

Abilify may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Abilify. Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather and during exercise. It is easier to become dangerously overheated and dehydrated while you are taking Abilify.

See also: Abilify and alcohol (in more detail)
Abilify side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Abilify: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Abilify and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fever, stiff muscles, confusion, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats;

jerky muscle movements you cannot control;

sudden numbness or weakness, headache, confusion, or problems with vision, speech, or balance;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores in your mouth and throat;

increased thirst or urination, loss of appetite, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, nausea, and vomiting;

seizure (convulsions);

thoughts of hurting yourself;

feeling like you might pass out;

jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes); or

urinating less than usual or not at all.

Less serious Abilify side effects may include:

choking or trouble swallowing;

dizziness, drowsiness, or weakness;

constipation, mild stomach upset;

headache, anxiety;

sleep problems (insomnia); or

weight gain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Abilify side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Abilify?

Before you take Abilify, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by Abilify.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

a medication to treat high blood pressure or a heart condition;

carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton), or phenytoin (Dilantin);

rifabutin (Mycobutin) or rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, Rifater);

ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox);

quinidine (Quin-G); or

fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), or paroxetine (Paxil).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Abilify. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.