Mdsale:

Where to Buy Coreg online with fast shipping and best price!

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Mdsale:

Buy Coreg online with fast shipping and best price!

No Prescription Needed.

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Compare Coreg prices among top online pharmacies!

Find the best coreg prices from online pharmacies.

Compare Prices for Coreg!

To find the lowest Coreg prices, click below on the strength of interest.

Strength Price (Per Unit) Click Below For Prices

12,5 mg

$  -  $

25 mg

$0.96  -  $3.37

3,12 mg

$  -  $

6,25 mg

$  -  $

12.5 mg

$0.31  -  $3.07

6.25 mg

$0.55  -  $3.30

3.12 mg

$0.61  -  $0.99

3.125 mg

$1.18  -  $2.57

Online Coreg prices listed are typically lower than those found on other popular price comparison websites. You will find international and Canadian online pharmacy prices, in addition to U.S. pharmacy prices available with a prescription discount card, for brand and generic medications.

What is Coreg?

Coreg (carvedilol) belongs to a a group of drugs called beta-blockers. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).

Coreg is used to treat heart failure and hypertension (high blood pressure). It is also used after a heart attack that has caused your heart not to pump as well.

Coreg may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information know about Coreg

You should not take Coreg if you are allergic to carvedilol, or if you have asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, severe liver disease, or a serious heart condition such as heart block, sick sinus syndrome, or slow heart rate (unless you have a pacemaker).

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using Coreg. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Do not stop taking Coreg without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse. Avoid drinking alcohol within 2 hours before or after taking extended-release carvedilol (Coreg CR). Also avoid taking medicines or other products that might contain alcohol. Alcohol may cause the carvedilol in Coreg CR to be released too quickly into the body.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using Coreg even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.
Before taking Coreg

You should not take Coreg if you are allergic to carvedilol, or if you have:

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asthma, bronchitis, emphysema;
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severe liver disease; or
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a serious heart condition such as heart block, sick sinus syndrome, or slow heart rate (unless you have a pacemaker).

To make sure you can safely take Coreg, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

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diabetes (taking Coreg can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar);
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angina (chest pain);
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low blood pressure;
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kidney disease;
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liver disease;
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a thyroid disorder;
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pheochromocytoma (tumor of the adrenal gland);
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circulation problems (such as Raynaud's syndrome); or
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a history of allergies.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Coreg will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using Coreg. It is not known whether carvedilol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking Coreg.

See also: Coreg pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Coreg?

Take Coreg exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Coreg works best if you take it with food. Take Coreg at the same time every day. Do not skip doses or stop taking Coreg without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse.

You may open the Coreg capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of pudding or applesauce to make swallowing easier. Swallow right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Discard the empty capsule.

If you are switched from Coreg tablets to carvedilol extended-release capsules (Coreg CR), your daily total dose of this medicine may be higher or lower than before. Older adults may be more likely to become dizzy or feel faint when switching from tablets to extended-release capsules. Follow your doctor's instructions.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using Coreg even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using Coreg. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Coreg can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using Coreg before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

Coreg is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.

Store Coreg at room temperature away from moisture and heat.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include uneven heartbeats, shortness of breath, bluish-colored fingernails, dizziness, weakness, fainting, and seizure (convulsions).
What should I avoid while taking Coreg?

Coreg may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid drinking alcohol within 2 hours before or after taking extended-release carvedilol (Coreg CR). Also avoid taking medicines or other products that might contain alcohol. Alcohol may cause the carvedilol in Coreg CR to be released too quickly into the body. Check the labels of any prescription or over-the-counter medicines you take to see if they contain alcohol (also called ethanol).

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

See also: Coreg and alcohol (in more detail)
Coreg side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Coreg: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

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feeling like you might pass out;
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slow or uneven heartbeats;
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chest pain, dry cough, wheezing, chest tightness,trouble breathing;
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feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;
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swelling, rapid weight gain;
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numbness or cold feeling in your hands and feet;
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loss of bladder control;
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pale skin, feeling light-headed, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating;
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high blood sugar (increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, weight loss); or
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severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious Coreg side effects may include:

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dizziness, drowsiness;
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nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;
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dry eyes;
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feeling weak or tired;
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joint pain;
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cough; or
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decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Coreg side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Coreg?

Many drugs can interact with Coreg. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

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allergy treatments (or if you are undergoing allergy skin-testing);
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cimetidine (Tagamet);
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cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);
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fluconazole (Diflucan);
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insulin or oral diabetes medication;
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rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate);
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an antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip, Limbitrol), bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), duloxetine (Cymbalta), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), imipramine (Tofranil), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft);
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heart or blood pressure medicine such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta), clonidine (Catapres), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia), reserpine, verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others;
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a heart rhythm medication such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin), flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rythmol), or quinidine (Quin-G);
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HIV or AIDS medicine such as delavirdine (Rescriptor) or ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra);
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an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);
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medicine to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting, such as metoclopramide (Reglan) or promethazine (Pentazine, Phenergan, Anergan, Antinaus);
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medicine to treat psychiatric disorders, such as aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), haloperidol (Haldol), perphenazine (Trilafon), or thioridazine (Mellaril); or
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a narcotic such as methadone (Methadose, Diskets, Dolophine) or propoxyphene (Daron, Darvocet).

This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coreg. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you.