Mdsale:

Where to Buy Doxycycline online with fast shipping and best price!

No Prescription Needed.

Mdsale:

Buy Doxycycline online with fast shipping and best price!

No Prescription Needed.

Search:

Compare Doxycycline prices among top online pharmacies!

Find the best doxycycline prices from online pharmacies.

Compare Prices for Doxycycline!

To find the lowest Doxycycline prices, click below on the strength of interest.

Strength Price (Per Unit) Click Below For Prices

100 mg

$0.19  -  $3.30

200 mg

$0.42  -  $0.77

Online Doxycycline prices listed are typically lower than those found on other popular price comparison websites. You will find international and Canadian online pharmacy prices, in addition to U.S. pharmacy prices available with a prescription discount card, for brand and generic medications.

What is doxycycline?

Doxycycline is a tetracycline antibiotic. It fights bacteria in the body.

Doxycycline is used to treat many different bacterial infections, such as urinary tract infections, acne, gonorrhea, and chlamydia, periodontitis (gum disease), and others.

Doxycycline is also used to treat blemishes, bumps, and acne-like lesions caused by rosacea. Doxycycline will not treat facial redness caused by rosacea.

Doxycycline may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about doxycycline?

Do not use this medicine if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby or cause permanent tooth discoloration later in life.

Doxycycline can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while using doxycycline.

You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to doxycycline or to other tetracycline antibiotics such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap).

Before taking doxycycline, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, kidney disease, asthma, or if you are allergic to sulfites.

Drink plenty of liquids while you are taking doxycycline.

Children should not use doxycycline. Doxycycline can cause permanent yellowing or graying of the teeth in children younger than 8 years old.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking doxycycline?

You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to doxycycline or to other tetracycline antibiotics such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap).

To make sure you can safely take doxycycline, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease;

kidney disease; or

asthma or sulfite allergy.

If you are using doxycycline to treat gonorrhea, your doctor may test you to make sure you do not also have syphilis, another sexually transmitted disease.

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use doxycycline if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby or cause permanent tooth discoloration later in life. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment.

Doxycycline can make birth control pills less effective. Ask your doctor about using a non hormone method of birth control (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) to prevent pregnancy while using doxycycline.

Doxycycline passes into breast milk and may affect bone and tooth development in a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking doxycycline.

Children should not use doxycycline. Doxycycline can cause permanent yellowing or graying of the teeth in children younger than 8 years old.
How should I take doxycycline?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take doxycycline with a full glass of water. Drink plenty of liquids while you are taking doxycycline.

Different brands of doxycycline may have different instructions about taking them with or without food.

Most brands of doxycyline may be taken with food or milk if the medicine upsets your stomach.

Take Oracea or Periostat on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

You may open a Doryx capsule or break up a Doryx tablet and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce to make swallowing easier. Swallow right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Drink a full glass (8 ounces) of cool water right away.

Do not crush, break, or open a delayed-release capsule. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time. The enteric coated pill has a special coating to protect your stomach. Breaking the pill will damage this coating.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Doxycycline will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using doxycycline. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date on the label has passed. Using expired doxycycline can cause damage to your kidneys.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
What should I avoid while taking doxycycline?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking doxycycline and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Doxycycline can make you sunburn more easily. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors.

Do not take iron supplements, multivitamins, calcium supplements, antacids, or laxatives within 2 hours before or after taking doxycycline.
Doxycycline side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe headache, dizziness, blurred vision;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, swollen glands, rash or itching, joint pain, or general ill feeling;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

diarrhea that is watery or bloody

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, confusion or weakness;

severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate;

loss of appetite, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, mild diarrhea;

upset stomach;

mild skin rash or itching; or

vaginal itching or discharge.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: doxycycline side effects (in more detail)
Doxycycline Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Acne:

Initial dose: 100 mg orally twice a day for 3 to 6 weeks, or until improvement occurs
Maintenance dose: 50 to 150 mg orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Acne Rosacea:

100 mg orally twice a day

Oracea (R) capsules: 40 mg orally once a day in the morning on an empty stomach, preferably at least 1 hour prior to or 2 hours after meals

Usual Adult Dose for Actinomycosis:

Penicillin-allergic patients: 100 mg orally or IV every 12 hours for as long as 6 to 12 months

Usual Adult Dose for Amebiasis:

100 mg orally twice a day as an adjunct to amebicides

Usual Adult Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis:

Postexposure prophylaxis: 100 mg orally every 12 hours for 60 days following initial exposure
The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline as an alternative agent to ciprofloxacin for postexposure anthrax prophylaxis after an intentional Bacillus anthracis release.

Usual Adult Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis:

100 mg orally every 12 hours for 60 days following initial exposure
IV therapy with multiple drugs is recommended if there is evidence of systemic involvement or if head or neck lesions are present.

The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended ciprofloxacin or doxycycline for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax after an intentional Bacillus anthracis release.

Usual Adult Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis:

100 mg orally or IV every 12 hours for a total of 60 days
One or two additional antibiotics with activity against anthrax should also be given (i.e., rifampin, vancomycin, penicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, clindamycin, or clarithromycin). The switch from IV to oral therapy should be made as soon as it is clinically feasible.

Treatment for anthrax used as a biological weapon:

Contained-casualty setting: 100 mg IV every 12 hours plus one or two additional antibiotics; may switch to oral therapy when clinically appropriate, for total treatment duration of 60 days
The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended ciprofloxacin or doxycycline for the treatment of pulmonary anthrax in a contained-casualty setting.

Mass-casualty setting: 100 mg orally every 12 hours for 60 days
The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline as an alternative to ciprofloxacin for the treatment of pulmonary anthrax in a mass-casualty setting.

Usual Adult Dose for Bartonellosis:

100 mg orally or IV twice a day (in combination with rifampin 300 mg twice a day for severe disease)

Duration:
Mild to moderate disease: 10 to 14 days
Bacillary angiomatosis: 8 weeks
Neuroretinitis: 4 to 6 weeks
Osteomyelitis or peliosis hepatitis: 4 months

Usual Adult Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection:

100 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 to 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis:

100 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 to 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Brucellosis:

100 mg orally twice a day for 6 weeks, in combination with gentamicin, streptomycin, or rifampin

Usual Adult Dose for Chlamydia Infection:

Urethral, endocervical, or rectal infection: 100 mg orally twice a day for 7 days

Single-dose azithromycin is the preferred agent if patient compliance is questionable.

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Cholera:

300 mg orally once, as an adjunct to fluid and electrolyte replacement

Usual Adult Dose for Epididymitis -- Sexually Transmitted:

100 mg orally twice a day for 10 days, in conjunction with ceftriaxone

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroenteritis:

Due to Listeria monocytogenes or Yersinia enterocolitica: 100 mg orally twice a day

Due to Tropheryma whippelii: 100 mg orally twice a day for 1 year after initial 10- to 14-day therapy with penicillin G, streptomycin or ceftriaxone

Usual Adult Dose for Granuloma Inguinale:

100 mg orally twice a day for at least 3 weeks or until all lesions have healed
Gentamicin may be added if no improvement is observed after several days.

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Inclusion Conjunctivitis:

100 mg orally twice a day for 7 to 21 days

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease -- Arthritis:

100 mg orally every 12 hours for 14 to 28 days

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease -- Carditis:

100 mg orally every 12 hours for 14 to 28 days

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease -- Erythema Chronicum Migrans:

100 mg orally every 12 hours for 14 to 21 days

Usual Adult Dose for Lyme Disease -- Neurologic:

100 mg orally every 12 hours for 14 to 28 days

Usual Adult Dose for Lymphogranuloma Venereum:

100 mg orally twice a day for 21 days or until symptoms have resolved; patients with HIV may require longer therapy

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria:

Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and P vivax: 100 mg orally twice a day for 7 days plus quinine sulfate 650 mg every 8 hours for 3 to 7 days

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria Prophylaxis:

Chloroquine-resistant areas: 100 mg orally once a day
Begin 1 to 2 days before travel to the malarious area. Continue daily during travel in the malarious area and for 4 weeks after leaving.

Usual Adult Dose for Melioidosis:

Doxycycline 100 mg orally twice a day plus chloramphenicol 10 mg/kg orally (not available in the United States) 4 times a day plus sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim 25 mg/kg - 5 mg/kg orally twice a day

This oral regimen may be initiated after the patient has received parenteral treatment with ceftazidime, imipenem, or meropenem for at least 10 days.

Duration: Doxycycline and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim for 20 weeks; chloramphenicol for the first 8 weeks

Usual Adult Dose for Nongonococcal Urethritis:

100 mg orally twice a day for 7 days

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Periodontitis:

20 mg orally twice a day for up to 9 months, as an adjunct to scaling and root planing

Usual Adult Dose for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

100 mg orally or IV every 12 hours in combination with cefotetan, cefoxitin, or ceftriaxone, with or without metronidazole or clindamycin

Duration: 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Plague:

100 mg orally or IV twice a day for 10 days

Treatment of plague used as a biological weapon:

Contained-casualty setting: 100 mg IV twice a day or 200 mg IV once a day for 10 days; may switch to oral doxycycline when clinically indicated
The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline as an alternative to streptomycin and gentamicin if they are contraindicated, unavailable, or inactive in vitro.

Mass-casualty setting:
Treatment: 100 mg orally twice a day for 10 days
Postexposure prophylaxis: 100 mg orally twice a day for 7 days
The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline or ciprofloxacin for plague treatment or postexposure prophylaxis in a mass-casualty setting.

Usual Adult Dose for Pleural Effusion:

Sclerosing agent: Mix 500 mg of the powder for injection and 10 mL of lidocaine 1% in 50 mL of normal saline and inject into pleural space. Clinical trials have reported use of doses ranging from 250 mg to 1 g.

Usual Adult Dose for Mycoplasma Pneumonia:

100 mg orally or IV every 12 hours for 10 to 21 days

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia:

100 mg orally or IV every 12 hours for 10 to 21 days

Usual Adult Dose for Psittacosis:

100 mg orally twice a day for 7 to 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Ornithosis:

100 mg orally twice a day for 7 to 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Proctitis:

Sexually transmitted: 100 mg orally twice a day, in conjunction with ceftriaxone

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Enterocolitis:

Sexually transmitted: 100 mg orally twice a day, in conjunction with ceftriaxone

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Rickettsial Infection:

Rocky Mountain spotted fever, relapsing fever, or typhus: 100 mg orally or IV twice a day for 7 days

Human monocytic or granulocytic ehrlichiosis: 100 mg orally or IV twice a day for 7 to 14 days

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection:

Vibrio vulnificus: 100 mg IV or orally every 12 hours plus cefotaxime 2 g IV every 8 hours or ceftazidime 1 to 2 g IV every 8 hours

Usual Adult Dose for STD Prophylaxis:

Sexual assault victims: 100 mg orally twice a day for 7 days, in conjunction with metronidazole and ceftriaxone

Usual Adult Dose for Syphilis -- Early:

100 mg orally twice a day for 2 weeks (4 weeks if more than 1 year duration)

Some manufacturers recommend 300 mg/day orally or IV for at least 10 days for the treatment of primary or secondary syphilis.

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Penicillin is the drug of choice. Penicillin-allergic or pregnant patients should be desensitized and treated with benzathine penicillin.

Usual Adult Dose for Syphilis -- Latent:

100 mg orally twice a day for 28 days

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Penicillin is the drug of choice. Penicillin-allergic or pregnant patients should be desensitized and treated with benzathine penicillin.

Usual Adult Dose for Tertiary Syphilis:

100 mg orally twice a day for 28 days

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Penicillin is the drug of choice. Penicillin-allergic or pregnant patients should be desensitized and treated with benzathine penicillin.

Usual Adult Dose for Trachoma:

100 mg orally twice a day for 7 days

Usual Adult Dose for Tularemia:

100 mg orally or IV twice a day for 14 to 21 days

Treatment of tularemia used as a biological weapon:

Contained-casualty setting: 100 mg IV twice a day for 14 to 21 days; may switch to oral doxycycline when clinically indicated
The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline or ciprofloxacin as an alternative to streptomycin and gentamicin if they are contraindicated, not available, or inactive in vitro.

Mass-casualty setting, treatment and postexposure prophylaxis: 100 mg orally twice a day for 14 days
The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline or ciprofloxacin for tularemia treatment and prophylaxis in a mass-casualty setting.

Usual Adult Dose for Urinary Tract Infection:

Chronic: 100 mg orally every 12 hours

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Infection:

8 years or older:
45 kg or less:
Oral:
Initial dose: 4.4 mg/kg divided into 2 doses on the first day
Maintenance dose: 2.2 mg/kg/day, given once a day or in 2 divided doses; for more severe infections, up to 4.4 mg/kg may be used

IV:
Initial dose: 4.4 mg/kg on the first day, given in 1 or 2 infusions
Maintenance dose: 2.2 to 4.4 mg/kg, given in 1 or 2 infusions, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Greater than 45 kg:
Oral:
Initial dose: 200 mg divided into 2 doses on the first day
Maintenance dose: 100 mg/day, given once a day or in 2 divided doses; for more severe infections, 100 mg every 12 hours is recommended

IV:
Initial dose: 200 mg on the first day, given in 1 or 2 infusions
Maintenance dose: 100 to 200 mg/day, depending on the nature and severity of the infection; 200 mg may be given in 1 or 2 infusions

Usual Pediatric Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis:

Treatment of anthrax used as a biological weapon:
7 years or less: 2.2 mg/kg (maximum 100 mg) orally or IV every 12 hours for 60 days following exposure
8 years or older and less than 45 kg: 2.2 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours for 60 days following exposure
8 years or older and 45 kg or more: 100 mg orally or IV every 12 hours for 60 days following exposure

The switch from IV to oral therapy should be made as soon as it is clinically feasible.

The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has suggested doxycycline as an alternative agent if ciprofloxacin is unavailable or contraindicated, for postexposure anthrax prophylaxis in a mass-casualty setting after intentional release of Bacillus anthracis.

If doxycycline oral suspension is not available, emergency doses may be prepared from tablets as follows:

1. Put a 100 mg doxycycline tablet into a small bowl and grind into a fine powder using the back of a metal teaspoon.

2. Mix the powder with 4 teaspoons of soft food or drink until the powder dissolves. Drinks work better than foods for dissolving the powder. The taste is generally acceptable when mixed in low-fat white milk, low-fat or regular chocolate milk, chocolate pudding, or apple juice mixed with sugar. Jellies, yogurt, and water do not hide the bitter taste of doxycycline. The mixture may be stored for up to 24 hours; after that, unused portions should be thrown away. Mixtures made with milk or pudding should be refrigerated.

3. Use measuring spoons, if available, to measure the correct dose of this mixture. If the child weighs:
12.5 lbs or less: Give one-half (1/2) teaspoon (12.5 mg doxycycline) twice a day
12.5 to 25 lbs: Give one (1) teaspoon (25 mg doxycycline) twice a day
25 to 37.5 lbs: Give one and one-half (1 1/2) teaspoons (37.5 mg doxycycline) twice a day
37.5 to 50 lbs: Give two (2) teaspoons (50 mg doxycycline) twice a day
50 to 62.5 lbs: Give two and one-half (2 1/2) teaspoons (62.5 mg doxycycline) twice a day
62.5 to 75 lbs: Give three (3) teaspoons (75 mg doxycycline) twice a day
75 to 87.5 lbs: Give three and one-half (3 1/2) teaspoons (87.5 mg doxycycline) twice a day
87.5 to 100 lbs: Give four (4) teaspoons (100 mg doxycycline) twice a day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cutaneous Bacillus anthracis:

Treatment of anthrax used as a biological weapon:
7 years or less: 2.2 mg/kg (maximum 100 mg) orally every 12 hours for 60 days
8 years or older and less than 45 kg: 2.2 mg/kg orally every 12 hours for 60 days
8 years or older and 45 kg or more: 100 mg orally every 12 hours for 60 days

IV therapy with multiple drugs is recommended if there is evidence of systemic involvement or if head or neck lesions are present. The switch from IV to oral therapy should be made as soon as it is clinically feasible.

The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended ciprofloxacin or doxycycline for the treatment of cutaneous anthrax after an intentional Bacillus anthracis release.

If doxycycline oral suspension is not available, emergency doses may be prepared from tablets. Refer to directions under "Anthrax Prophylaxis" for pediatric patients.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis:

Treatment of anthrax used as a biological weapon:
Less than 8 years: 2.2 mg/kg (maximum 100 mg) orally or IV every 12 hours for 60 days
8 years or older and less than 45 kg: 2.2 mg/kg orally or IV every 12 hours for 60 days
8 years or older and 45 kg or more: 100 mg orally or IV every 12 hours for 60 days

One or two additional antibiotics with activity against anthrax should also be given (i.e., rifampin, vancomycin, penicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, clindamycin, or clarithromycin). The switch from IV to oral therapy should be made as soon as it is clinically feasible.

The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended ciprofloxacin or doxycycline for the treatment of pulmonary anthrax after an intentional Bacillus anthracis release.

If doxycycline oral suspension is not available, emergency doses may be prepared from tablets. Refer to directions under "Anthrax Prophylaxis" for pediatric patients.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Chlamydia Infection:

8 years or older and 45 kg or more: 100 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 days

Single-dose azithromycin is the preferred agent.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Lyme Disease:

8 years or older: 1 to 2 mg/kg (maximum 100 mg) orally twice a day for 14 to 28 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Malaria:

Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and P vivax:
8 years or older: 2 mg/kg (maximum 100 mg) orally twice a day for 7 days plus quinine sulfate 8.3 mg/kg every 8 hours for 3 to 7 days

Usual Pediatric Dose for Malaria Prophylaxis:

Chloroquine-resistant areas:
8 years or older: 2 mg/kg orally (maximum 100 mg) once a day
Begin 1 to 2 days before travel to the malarious area. Continue daily during travel in the malarious area and for 4 weeks after leaving.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Plague:

Treatment of plague used as a biological weapon:
Contained casualty setting:
Less than 45 kg: 2.2 mg/kg IV twice a day (maximum 200 mg/day) for 10 days; may switch to oral doxycycline when clinically indicated
45 kg or more: 100 mg IV twice a day for 10 days; may switch to oral doxycycline when clinically indicated

The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline as an alternative to streptomycin and gentamicin if they are contraindicated, unavailable, or inactive in vitro.

Mass casualty setting:
Treatment:
Less than 45 kg: 2.2 mg/kg orally twice a day (maximum 200 mg/day) for 10 days
45 kg or more: 100 mg orally twice a day for 10 days

Postexposure prophylaxis:
Less than 45 kg: 2.2 mg/kg orally twice a day (maximum 200 mg/day) for 7 days
45 kg or more: 100 mg orally twice a day for 7 days

The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline or ciprofloxacin for plague treatment or postexposure prophylaxis in a mass-casualty setting.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tularemia:

Treatment of tularemia used as a biological weapon:
Contained casualty setting:
Less than 45 kg: 2.2 mg/kg IV twice a day (maximum 200 mg/day) for 14 to 21 days; may switch to oral doxycycline when clinically indicated
45 kg or more: 100 mg IV twice a day for 14 to 21 days; may switch to oral doxycycline when clinically indicated

The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline as an alternative to streptomycin and gentamicin if they are contraindicated, unavailable, or inactive in vitro.

Mass casualty setting, treatment and postexposure prophylaxis:
Less than 45 kg: 2.2 mg/kg orally twice a day (maximum 200 mg/day) for 14 days
45 kg or more: 100 mg orally twice a day for 14 days

The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has recommended doxycycline or ciprofloxacin for tularemia treatment or postexposure prophylaxis in a mass-casualty setting.
What other drugs will affect doxycycline?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

cholesterol-lowering medications such as cholestyramine (Prevalite, Questran) or colestipol (Colestid);

isotretinoin (Accutane);

tretinoin (Renova, Retin-A, Vesanoid);

an antacid such as Tums, Rolaids, Milk of Magnesia, Maalox, and others;

a product that contains bismuth subsalicylate such as Pepto-Bismol;

minerals such as iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, and over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements;

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); or

a penicillin antibiotic such as amoxicillin (Amoxil, Augmentin, Dispermox, Moxatag), ampicillin (Principen, Unasyn), dicloxacillin (Dycill, Dynapen), oxacillin (Bactocill), or penicillin (Bicillin L-A, PC Pen VK, Pfizerpen).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with doxycycline. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.