How to buy ovral online cheaply!

What is Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?

Ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel contains a combination of female hormones that prevent ovulation (the release of an egg from an ovary). This medication also causes changes in your cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus and harder for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus.

Ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel is used as contraception to prevent pregnancy.

Ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?
Do not use birth control pills if you are pregnant or if you have recently had a baby. Do not use this medication if you have any of the following conditions: a history of stroke or blood clot, circulation problems (especially if caused by diabetes), a hormone-related cancer such as breast or uterine cancer, abnormal vaginal bleeding, liver disease or liver cancer, severe high blood pressure, migraine headaches, a heart valve disorder, or a history of jaundice caused by birth control pills.

You may need to use back-up birth control, such as condoms or a spermicide, when you first start using this medication. Follow your doctor’s instructions.
Taking hormones can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack, especially if you smoke and are older than 35.

Some drugs can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, including vitamins, minerals and herbal products. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?
This medication can cause birth defects. Do not use if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant, or if you miss two menstrual periods in a row. If you have recently had a baby, wait at least 4 weeks before taking birth control pills (6 weeks if you are breast-feeding). Do not use this medication if you have:

a history of a stroke or blood clot;

circulation problems (especially if caused by diabetes);

a hormone-related cancer such as breast or uterine cancer;

abnormal vaginal bleeding;

liver disease or liver cancer;

severe high blood pressure;

severe migraine headaches;

a heart valve disorder; or

a history of jaundice caused by birth control pills.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have any of the following conditions. You may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take birth control pills.

high blood pressure, heart disease, congestive heart failure, angina (chest pain), or a history of heart attack;

high cholesterol or if you are overweight;

a history of depression;

gallbladder disease;

diabetes;

seizures or epilepsy;

a history of irregular menstrual cycles; or

a history of fibrocystic breast disease, lumps, nodules, or an abnormal mammogram.

The hormones in birth control pills can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. This medication may also slow breast milk production. Do not use if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. You will take your first pill on the first day of your period or on the first Sunday after your period begins (follow your doctor’s instructions).

You may need to use back-up birth control, such as condoms or a spermicide, when you first start using this medication. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

The 28-day birth control pack contains seven “reminder” pills to keep you on your regular cycle. Your period will usually begin while you are using these reminder pills.
You may have breakthrough bleeding, especially during the first 3 months. Tell your doctor if this bleeding continues or is very heavy.

Take one pill every day, no more than 24 hours apart. When the pills run out, start a new pack the following day. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of pills completely.

If you need to have any type of medical tests or surgery, or if you will be on bed rest, you may need to stop using this medication for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are using birth control pills.

Your doctor will need to see you on a regular basis while you are using this medication. Do not miss any appointments.
Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Missing a pill increases your risk of becoming pregnant.

If you miss one “active” pill, take two pills on the day that you remember. Then take one pill per day for the rest of the pack.

If you miss two “active” pills in a row in week one or two, take two pills per day for two days in a row. Then take one pill per day for the rest of the pack. Use back-up birth control for at least 7 days following the missed pills.

If you miss two “active” pills in a row in week three, or if you miss three pills in a row during any of the first 3 weeks, throw out the rest of the pack and start a new one the same day if you are a Day 1 starter. If you are a Sunday starter, keep taking a pill every day until Sunday. On Sunday, throw out the rest of the pack and start a new one that day.

If you miss three “active” pills in a row during any of the first 3 weeks, throw out the rest of the pack and start a new pack on the same day if you are a Day 1 starter. If you are a Sunday starter, keep taking a pill every day until Sunday. On Sunday, throw out the rest of the pack and start a new one that day.
If you miss two or more pills, you may not have a period during the month. If you miss a period for two months in a row, call your doctor because you might be pregnant.

If you miss any reminder pills, throw them away and keep taking one pill per day until the pack is empty. You do not need back-up birth control if you miss a reminder pill.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?
Do not smoke while using birth control pills, especially if you are older than 35. Smoking can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack caused by birth control pills.

Birth control pills will not protect you from sexually transmitted diseases–including HIV and AIDS. Using a condom is the only way to protect yourself from these diseases.

Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel) side effects
Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;

a change in the pattern or severity of migraine headaches;

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;

a breast lump; or

symptoms of depression (sleep problems, weakness, mood changes).

Less serious side effects may include:

mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps;

breast pain, tenderness, or swelling;

freckles or darkening of facial skin;

increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair;

changes in weight or appetite;

problems with contact lenses;

vaginal itching or discharge;

changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or

nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect.

See also: Ovral side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Ovral (ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel)?

Some drugs can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before using birth control pills, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ascorbic acid (vitamin C);

phenylbutazone (Azolid, Butazolidin);

modafinil (Provigil);

dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol);

an antibiotic;

seizure medicines such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), topiramate (Topamax), and others;

a barbiturate such as amobarbital (Amytal), butabarbital (Butisol), mephobarbital (Mebaral), secobarbital (Seconal), or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or

HIV medicines such as amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), indinavir (Crixivan), saquinavir (Invirase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), ritonavir (Norvir), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can affect birth control pills. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy orlistat online cheaply!

What is orlistat?

Orlistat blocks some of the fat that you eat, keeping it from being absorbed by your body.

Orlistat is used together with a reduced-calorie diet and weight maintenance to treat obesity in people with certain risk factors (such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol or triglycerides).

Orlistat may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

It is dangerous to purchase orlistat on the Internet or from vendors outside of the United States. Medications distributed from Internet sales may contain dangerous ingredients, or may not be distributed by a licensed pharmacy. Samples of “alli” purchased on the Internet have been found to contain sibutramine (Meridia), a prescription weight loss medication that can have dangerous side effects in certain people. For more information, contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or visit www.fda.gov/buyonlineguide.
What is the most important information I should know about orlistat?

Do not take orlistat if you are pregnant. Weight loss is not recommended during pregnancy, even if you are overweight or obese.

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to orlistat, if you are pregnant, or if you have gallbladder problems or chronic malabsorption syndrome (an inability to absorb food and nutrients properly).

Before taking orlistat, tell your doctor if you have an underactive thyroid, a history of gallstones or pancreatitis, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, an eating disorder, liver or kidney disease, or if you take other weight-loss medications (prescription or over-the-counter).

Do not give over-the-counter orlistat (alli) to a child younger than 18 years old. Prescription orlistat (Xenical) should not be used by anyone age 12 to 18 without the advice of a doctor.

Orlistat should be used only by the person for whom it was prescribed. Never share orlistat with another person, especially someone who has a history of eating disorder. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

Orlistat is only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Your daily intake of fat, protein, and carbohydrates should be evenly divided over all of your daily meals. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Avoid a diet that is high in fat. High-fat meals taken in combination with orlistat can increase your risk of unpleasant side effects on your stomach or intestines.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking orlistat?

You should not take orlistat if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

gallbladder problems;

chronic malabsorption syndrome (an inability to absorb food and nutrients properly); or

if you are pregnant.

To make sure you can safely take orlistat, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

an underactive thyroid;

a history of gallstones or kidney stones;

a history of pancreatitis;

liver disease;

kidney disease;

type 1 or type 2 diabetes;

an eating disorder (anorexia or bulimia); or

if you take any other weight-loss medications (prescription or over-the-counter).

FDA pregnancy category X. Do not use orlistat if you are pregnant. Weight loss is not recommended during pregnancy, even if you are overweight or obese. Stop taking orlistat and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant.

Taking orlistat can make it harder for your body to absorb certain vitamins. These vitamins are important if you are nursing a baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give over-the-counter orlistat (alli) to a child younger than 18 years old. Prescription orlistat (Xenical) should not be used by anyone age 12 to 18 without the advice of a doctor.

Orlistat should be used only by the person for whom it was prescribed. Never share orlistat with another person, especially someone who has a history of eating disorder. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.
How should I take orlistat?

Take exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

This medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Orlistat is only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. Your daily intake of fat, protein, and carbohydrates should be evenly divided over all of your daily meals. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Take orlistat during or within 1 hour after a meal that contains some fat (no more than 30% of the calories for that meal). Orlistat is usually taken 3 times daily.

If you skip a meal or you eat a meal that does not contain any fat, skip your orlistat dose for that meal.

The fat content of your daily diet should not be greater than 30% of your total daily caloric intake. For example, if you eat 1200 calories per day, no more than 360 of those calories should be in the form of fat.

Read the label of all food items you consume, paying special attention to the number of servings per container. Your doctor, nutrition counselor, or dietitian can help you develop a healthy eating plan.

Your doctor may recommend you take vitamin and mineral supplements while you are taking orlistat. This medication can make it harder for your body to absorb fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamins A, D, E, and K. Follow your doctor’s instructions about the type of multi-vitamin or mineral supplement to use.

Take your vitamin or supplement at bedtime, or at least 2 hours before or after you take orlistat.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed. Throw away any unused orlistat after the expiration date on the medicine label has passed.

Keep track of the amount of medicine used from each new bottle. Orlistat is a drug that may be misused as a weight-loss aid, and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription.

See also: Orlistat dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember, but no more than 1 hour after eating a meal. If it has been more than an hour since your last meal, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

If you miss a meal, or if you have a meal without fat, you can skip your dose of orlistat for that meal also.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.
What should I avoid while taking orlistat?

Avoid a diet that is high in fat. High-fat meals taken in combination with orlistat can increase your risk of unpleasant side effects on your stomach or intestines.
Orlistat side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using orlistat and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

severe pain in your lower back, blood in your urine;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

drowsiness, confusion, mood changes, increased thirst;

swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath;

severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate; or

nausea, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

The following side effects occur commonly with the use of orlistat. They are the natural effects of orlistat’s fat-blocking action and are actually signs that the medication is working properly. These side effects are usually temporary and may lessen as you continue treatment with orlistat:

oily spotting in your undergarments;

oily or fatty stools;

orange or brown colored oil in your stool;

gas with discharge, an oily discharge;

loose stools, or an urgent need to go to the bathroom, inability to control bowel movements;

an increased number of bowel movements;

stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rectal pain; or

weakness, dark urine, clay-colored stools, itching, loss of appetite, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Other side effects that may occur while taking orlistat include:

problems with your teeth or gums;

cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, cough;

fever, chills, sore throat, flu symptoms;

headache, back pain; or

mild skin rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: orlistat side effects (in more detail)
Orlistat Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Obesity:

120 mg orally three times a day with each main meal containing fat. The dose may be taken during the meal or within 1 hour of completing the meal.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Obesity:

12 years or older:
120 mg orally three times a day with each main meal containing fat. The dose may be taken during the meal or within 1 hour of completing the meal.
What other drugs will affect orlistat?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);

a vitamin or mineral supplement that contains beta carotene or vitamin E;

levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid);

insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth;

digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); or

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with orlistat. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over the counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy omnicef online cheaply!

What is Omnicef?

Omnicef (cefdinir) is in a group of drugs called cephalosporin (SEF a low spor in) antibiotics. It works by fighting bacteria in your body.

Omnicef is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria.

Omnicef may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Omnicef

Do not take Omnicef if you are allergic to cefdinir, or to similar antibiotics, such as Ceftin, Cefzil, Keflex, and others.

Before taking Omnicef, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs (especially penicillin). Also tell your doctor if you have kidney disease or a history of intestinal problems.

Take Omnicef for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Omnicef will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking Omnicef and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.
Before taking Omnicef

Do not take Omnicef if you are allergic to cefdinir or to other cephalosporin antibiotics, such as:

*

  cefaclor (Raniclor);
*

  cefadroxil (Duricef);
*

  cefazolin (Ancef);
*

  cefditoren (Spectracef);
*

  cefpodoxime (Vantin);
*

  cefprozil (Cefzil);
*

  ceftibuten (Cedax);
*

  cefuroxime (Ceftin);
*

  cephalexin (Keflex); or
*

  cephradine (Velosef); and others.

To make sure you can safely take Omnicef, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

* kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);
*

  a history of intestinal problems, such as colitis; or
*

  if you are allergic to any drugs (especially penicillins).

FDA pregnancy category B. Omnicef is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether cefdinir passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Omnicef without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

See also: Omnicef pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)

The Omnicef suspension (liquid) contains sucrose. Talk to your doctor before using this form of cefdinir if you have diabetes.
How should I take Omnicef?

Take Omnicef exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

You may take Omnicef with or without food.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Omnicef can cause you to have false results with certain medical tests, including urine glucose (sugar) tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using cefdinir.

Take this medication for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Cefdinir will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Store Omnicef at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Throw away any unused liquid that is older than 10 days.

See also: Omnicef dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and diarrhea.
What should I avoid while taking Omnicef?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking Omnicef and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Avoid using antacids or mineral supplements that contain iron within 2 hours before or after taking Omnicef. Antacids or iron can make it harder for your body to absorb Omnicef. This does not include baby formula fortified with iron.

Taking Omnicef with products that contain iron may cause your stools (bowel movements) to appear red in color. If this discoloration looks like blood in your stools, call your doctor.
Omnicef side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Omnicef: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

*

  diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
*

  chest pain;
*

  fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;
*

  unusual bleeding;
*

  seizure (convulsions);
*

  pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, confusion or weakness;
*

  jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
*

  fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or
*

  increased thirst, loss of appetite, swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath, urinating less than usual or not at all.

Less serious Omnicef side effects may include:

*

  nausea, stomach pain, indigestion, vomiting, mild diarrhea;
*

  headache, dizziness;
*

  diaper rash in an infant taking liquid Omnicef;
*

  mild itching or skin rash; or
*

  vaginal itching or discharge.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Omnicef side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Omnicef?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

*

  probenecid (Benemid); or
*

  vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Omnicef. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy olmesartan online cheaply!

What is olmesartan?

Olmesartan is in a group of drugs called angiotensin II receptor antagonists. Olmesartan keeps blood vessels from narrowing, which lowers blood pressure and improves blood flow.

Olmesartan is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) in adults and children who are at least 6 years old. It is sometimes given together with other blood pressure medications.

Olmesartan may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about olmesartan?

Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Olmesartan can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to olmesartan.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of olmesartan.

Do not use potassium supplements or salt substitutes while you are taking olmesartan, unless your doctor has told you to.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking olmesartan?

You should not take olmesartan if you are allergic to it.

To make sure you can safely take olmesartan, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

kidney disease;

liver disease;

congestive heart failure; or

if you are dehydrated.

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use olmesartan if you are pregnant. Stop using olmesartan and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Olmesartan can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester. Use effective birth control while taking olmesartan.

It is not known whether olmesartan passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking olmesartan.
How should I take olmesartan?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

You may take olmesartan with or without food.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Conditions that may cause very low blood pressure include: vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, heart disease, dialysis, a low salt diet, or taking diuretics (water pills). Follow your doctor’s instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink while taking olmesartan. Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Olmesartan dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include extreme dizziness, fast or slow heartbeat, or fainting.
What should I avoid while taking olmesartan?

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of olmesartan.

Do not use potassium supplements or salt substitutes while you are taking olmesartan, unless your doctor has told you to.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.
Olmesartan side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

feeling like you might pass out;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

chest pain, fast heart rate; or

swelling in your hands or feet.

Less serious side effects may include:

dizziness;

joint or muscle pain;

back pain;

stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea;

mild itching or skin rash; or

weakness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: olmesartan side effects (in more detail)
Olmesartan Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension:

Initial dose: 20 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: May increase to 40 mg/day if further blood pressure reduction is necessary after 2 weeks. Diuretics or other antihypertensive agents may be added.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hypertension:

6 to 16 years of age:

20 to less than 35 kg (44 to 77 pounds): Initial: 10 mg orally once daily; Maximum: if the initial response is inadequate after 2 weeks, dose may be increased to a maximum of 20 mg/day.

Greater than or equal to 35 kg (greater than or equal to 77 pounds): 20 mg orally once daily; Maximum: if the initial response is inadequate after 2 weeks, dose may be increased to a maximum of 40 mg/day.
What other drugs will affect olmesartan?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

blood pressure medications such as a diuretic (water pill); or

an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

There may be other drugs that can interact with olmesartan. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy olanzapine online cheaply!

What is olanzapine?

Olanzapine is an antipsychotic medication that affects chemicals in the brain.

Olanzapine is used to treat the symptoms of psychotic conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (manic depression) in adults and children who are at least 13 years old.

Olanzapine is sometimes used together with other antipsychotic medications or antidepressants.

Olanzapine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about olanzapine?

Olanzapine is not for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia. Olanzapine may cause heart failure, sudden death, or pneumonia in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

You may gain weight or have high cholesterol and triglycerides (types of fat) while taking this medicine, especially if you are a teenager. Your blood may need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.
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Treatments for depression are getting better everyday and there are things you can start doing right away.

Olanzapine can cause high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). If you are diabetic, check your blood sugar levels on a regular basis while you are taking olanzapine.

Olanzapine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking olanzapine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather and during exercise. It is easier to become dangerously overheated and dehydrated while you are taking olanzapine.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking olanzapine?

Olanzapine is not for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia. Olanzapine may cause heart failure, sudden death, or pneumonia in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

You should not take olanzapine if you are allergic to it.

To make sure you can safely take olanzapine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

liver disease;

heart disease, high or low blood pressure;

a history of low white blood cell (WBC) counts;

high cholesterol or triglycerides;

a history of heart failure, heart attack, or stroke;

a history of breast cancer;

seizures or epilepsy;

diabetes;

an enlarged prostate or difficulty urinating;

bowel problems; or

narrow-angle glaucoma.

FDA pregnancy category C. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

Taking antipsychotic medication during the last 3 months of pregnancy may cause problems in the newborn, such as withdrawal symptoms, breathing problems, feeding problems, fussiness, tremors, and limp or stiff muscles. However, you may have withdrawal symptoms or other problems if you stop taking your medicine during pregnancy. If you become pregnant while taking olanzapine, do not stop taking it without your doctor’s advice.

Olanzapine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using olanzapine.

The olanzapine orally disintegrating tablet (Zyprexa Zydis) may contain phenylalanine. Talk to your doctor before using this form of olanzapine if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).
How should I take olanzapine?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Olanzapine can be taken with or without food.

Olanzapine is usually taken once a day. Olanzapine may be only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes counseling and other psychological support programs. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve, or if they get worse while using olanzapine. Do not stop taking olanzapine suddenly without first talking to your doctor, even if you feel fine. You may have serious side effects if you stop taking olanzapine suddenly.

To take olanzapine orally disintegrating tablets (Zyprexa Zydis):

Keep the tablet in its blister pack until you are ready to take it. Open the package and peel back the foil from the tablet blister. Do not push a tablet through the foil or you may damage the tablet.

Using dry hands, remove the tablet and place it in your mouth. It will begin to dissolve right away.

Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing.

Swallow several times as the tablet dissolves. If desired, you may drink liquid to help swallow the dissolved tablet.

Olanzapine can cause high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). If you are diabetic, check your blood sugar levels on a regular basis while you are taking olanzapine.

You may gain weight or have high cholesterol and triglycerides (types of fat) while taking this medicine, especially if you are a teenager. Your blood may need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you are taking a combination of drugs, use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

See also: Olanzapine dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, agitation, aggression, slurred speech, confusion, increased heart rate, jerky or uncontrolled muscle movements, trouble breathing, or fainting.
What should I avoid while taking olanzapine?

Olanzapine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can increase sleepiness caused by olanzapine.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather and during exercise. It is easier to become dangerously overheated and dehydrated while you are taking olanzapine.
Olanzapine side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using olanzapine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, tremors, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, slow heart rate, feeling like you might pass out;

twitching or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs;

trouble speaking or swallowing;

dry mouth, thirst, feeling very hot (with or without sweating), urinating less than usual or not at all;

high blood sugar (increased thirst, loss of appetite, fruity breath odor, increased urination, drowsiness, dry skin, nausea, and vomiting);

sudden numbness or weakness, confusion, or problems with vision, speech, or balance;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores in your mouth and throat;

swelling in your hands or feet;

changes in personality, unusual thoughts or behavior, hallucinations, or thoughts about hurting yourself; or

upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

weight gain (more likely in teenagers), increased appetite;

headache, dizziness, drowsiness, feeling tired or restless;

memory problems;

stomach pain, constipation, loss of bladder control;

back pain, pain in your arms or legs;

numbness or tingly feeling;

breast swelling or discharge (in women or men); or

missed menstrual periods.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: olanzapine side effects (in more detail)
Olanzapine Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Bipolar Disorder:

Oral (monotherapy):
Initial dose: 10 to 15 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 5 to 20 mg orally once a day.
Maximum dose: 20 mg orally once a day.

Oral (combination therapy with lithium or valproate):
Initial dose: 10 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 5 to 20 mg orally once a day.
Maximum dose: 20 mg orally once a day.

Injection:
Initial dose: 10 mg IM once.
Recommended dose: 10 mg IM once. A lower dose of 5 mg or 7.5 mg may be considered when clinical factors warrant. If agitation warranting additional intramuscular doses persists following the initial dose, subsequent doses up to 10 mg may be given. The efficacy of repeated doses of IM olanzapine in agitated patients has not been systematically evaluated in controlled clinical trials.

The safety of total daily dose greater than 30 mg (or 10 mg injections given more frequently than 2 hours after the initial dose and four hours after the second dose) has not been evaluated in clinical trials.

Dosage range: 2.5 mg to 10 mg IM once.

If ongoing olanzapine therapy is clinically indicated, oral olanzapine may be initiated in a range of 5 to 20 mg per day as soon as clinically appropriate.

Usual Adult Dose for Schizophrenia:

Oral:
Initial dose: 5 to 10 mg orally once a day.
Maintenance dose: 10 mg orally once a day.
Maximum dose: 20 mg orally once a day.

There are two olanzapine intramuscular formulations with different dosing schedules. Olanzapine intramuscular (10 mg/vial) is a short-acting formulation and should not be confused with olanzapine extended release injectable suspension (Brand Name: RELPREVV).

Short-acting Injection:
Initial dose: 10 mg IM once.
Recommended dose: 10 mg IM once. A lower dose of 5 mg or 7.5 mg may be considered when clinical factors warrant. If agitation warranting additional intramuscular doses persists following the initial dose, subsequent doses up to 10 mg may be given. The efficacy of repeated doses of IM olanzapine in agitated patients has not been systematically evaluated in controlled clinical trials.

The safety of total daily dose greater than 30 mg (or 10 mg injections given more frequently than 2 hours after the initial dose and four hours after the second dose) has not been evaluated in clinical trials.

Dosage range: 2.5 mg to 10 mg IM once.

If ongoing olanzapine therapy is clinically indicated, oral olanzapine may be initiated in a range of 5 to 20 mg per day as soon as clinically appropriate.

Extended Release Injectable Suspension:

The extended release injectable suspension is intended for deep intramuscular gluteal injection only and should not be administered intravenously or subcutaneously.

Tolerability should be established with oral olanzapine prior to initiating treatment with the extended release injectable suspension.

The efficacy of olanzapine extended release injectable suspension has been demonstrated within the range of 150 mg to 300 mg administered every 2 weeks and with 405 mg administered every 4 weeks.

Recommended Dosing for Olanzapine Extended Release Injectable Suspension Based on Correspondence to Oral Olanzapine Doses:

1) If the target oral olanzapine dose is 10 mg/day, then the dosing during the first 8 weeks is 210 mg/2 weeks or 405 mg/4 weeks, and the maintenance dose after 8 weeks is 150 mg/2 weeks or 300 mg/4 weeks.

2) If the target oral olanzapine dose is 15 mg/day, then the dosing during the first 8 weeks is 300 mg/2 weeks, and the maintenance dose after 8 weeks is 210 mg/2 weeks or 405 mg/4 weeks.

3) If the target oral olanzapine dose is 20 mg/day, then the dosing during the first 8 weeks is 300 mg/2 weeks, and the maintenance dose after 8 weeks is 300 mg/2 weeks.

Olanzapine extended release injectable suspension doses greater than 405 mg every 4 weeks or 300 mg every 2 weeks have not been evaluated in clinical trials.

For patients who are debilitated, who have a predisposition to hypotensive reactions, who otherwise exhibit a combination of factors that may result in slower metabolism of olanzapine (e.g., nonsmoking female patients 65 years of age or older), or who may be more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine:
Recommended starting dose: 150 mg/4 weeks
When indicated, dose escalation should be undertaken with caution in these patients.

Maintenance: Although no controlled studies have been conducted to determine how long patients should be treated with olanzapine extended release injectable suspension, efficacy has been demonstrated over a period of 24 weeks in patients with stabilized schizophrenia. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for continued treatment.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Bipolar Disorder:

Oral:
Initial dose: 5 mg orally once a day if debilitated or predisposed to hypotension.
Maintenance dose: May increase cautiously.

Injection:
Initial Dose: 5 mg IM once. A lower dose of 2.5 mg per injection should be considered for patients who otherwise may be debilitated, predisposed to hypotensive reactions, or who are more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Schizophrenia:

Oral:
Initial dose: 5 mg orally once a day if debilitated or predisposed to hypotension.
Maintenance dose: May increase cautiously.

There are two olanzapine intramuscular formulations with different dosing schedules. Olanzapine intramuscular (10 mg/vial) is a short-acting formulation and should not be confused with olanzapine extended release injectable suspension (Brand Name: RELPREVV).

Short-acting Injection:
Initial Dose: 5 mg IM once. A lower dose of 2.5 mg per injection should be considered for patients who otherwise may be debilitated, predisposed to hypotensive reactions, or who are more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine.

Extended Release Injectable Suspension:

For patients who are debilitated, who have a predisposition to hypotensive reactions, who otherwise exhibit a combination of factors that may result in slower metabolism of olanzapine (e.g., nonsmoking female patients 65 years of age or older), or who may be more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine:
Recommended starting dose: 150 mg/4 weeks
When indicated, dose escalation should be undertaken with caution.

Maintenance: Although no controlled studies have been conducted to determine how long patients should be treated with olanzapine extended release injectable suspension, efficacy has been demonstrated over a period of 24 weeks in patients with stabilized schizophrenia. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for continued treatment.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Schizophrenia:

8 to 12 years (Limited data available):
Initial: 2.5 to 5 mg once daily; increase dose in 2.5 or 5 mg increments at weekly intervals to target dose of 10 mg once daily; maximum dose: 20 mg/day.

13 to 17 years old:
Initial dose: 2.5 to 5 mg orally once a day
Maintenance dose: 10 mg orally once a day
Efficacy in adolescents with schizophrenia has been demonstrated based on a flexible dose range of 2.5 mg to 20 mg/day in clinical trials. When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 2.5 mg or 5 mg are recommended.

The safety and effectiveness of doses above 20 mg/day have not been evaluated in clinical trials.

Maintenance: The efficacy of olanzapine for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia in the adolescent population has not been systematically evaluated. However, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of olanzapine pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and adolescent patients. It is generally recommended that responding patients be continued beyond the acute response, but at the lowest dose needed to maintain remission. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bipolar Disorder:

4 to 5 years: Limited data available: Initial: 1.25 mg orally once daily; increase at weekly intervals according to response and tolerability to target dose: 10 mg/day.
6 to 12 years: Limited data available: Initial: 2.5 mg orally once daily; increase dose in 2.5 or 5 mg increments at weekly intervals to target dose of 10 mg once daily; maximum dose: 20 mg/day.

13 to 17 years old:
Initial dose: 2.5 mg to 5 mg orally once a day
Maintenance dose: 10 mg orally once a day
Efficacy in adolescents with bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) was demonstrated based on a flexible dose range of 2.5 to 20 mg/day in clinical trials. When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 2.5 or 5 mg are recommended.

The safety and effectiveness of doses above 20 mg/day have not been evaluated in clinical trials.

Maintenance: The efficacy of olanzapine for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in the adolescent population has not been evaluated. However, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of olanzapine pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and adolescent patients. It is generally recommended that responding patients be continued beyond the acute response, but at the lowest dose needed to maintain remission. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Anorexia Nervosa:

9 years and older: (Limited data available): 1.25 to 2.5 mg orally once daily has been shown in one small trial and several case reports to improve BMI and other disease related symptoms (e.g., eating attitudes, anxiety); another case series used initial doses of 2.5 mg once daily and final doses of 5 mg to 10 mg once daily; reported range: 1.25 to 12.5 mg/day; however, it has been suggested that higher doses (greater than 2.5 mg once daily) may not be associated with greater efficacy. Further studies are needed.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Tourette’s Syndrome:

Tourette syndrome, tic disorder:
7 years and older: Limited data available:
Patient weight less than 40 kg: Initial: 2.5 mg orally every other day for 3 days, increase to 2.5 mg every day for remainder of week; increase to 5 mg/day by second week if needed; then increase in 5 mg increments at weekly intervals as tolerated; maximum dose: 20 mg/day
Patient weight greater than 40 kg: Initial: 2.5 mg every day for 3 days; increase to 5 mg every day for remainder of week if needed, then increase in 5 mg increments at weekly intervals as tolerated; maximum dose: 20 mg/day
An open-label study of 10 pediatric patients (7 to 13 years of age) reported significant reductions in tic severity [Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS)] from baseline at a mean final dose of 14.5 mg/day after 8 weeks of treatment. An open-label trial of 12 children and adolescents (7 to 14 years of age) reported a significant reduction (30%) in total tic severity (YGTSS) at a final mean dose of 11.3 mg/day (range: 2.5 to 20 mg/day).
What other drugs will affect olanzapine?

Before using olanzapine, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing (such as cold or allergy medicine, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to the side effects of olanzapine.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

heart or blood pressure medication;

carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol);

diazepam (Valium);

fluoxetine and olanzapine (Symbyax);

fluvoxamine (Luvox);

omeprazole (Prilosec);

rifampin (Rifater, Rifadin, Rifamate); or

a medication to treat Parkinson's disease including levodopa (Sinemet, Larodopa, Atamet), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), pramipexole (Mirapex), ropinirole (Requip), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with olanzapine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy norvasc online cheaply!

What is Norvasc?

Norvasc (amlodipine) belongs to a group of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Norvasc relaxes (widens) blood vessels and improves blood flow.

Norvasc is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) or chest pain (angina) and other conditions caused by coronary artery disease. This medication is for use in adults and children who are at least 6 years old.

Norvasc may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Norvasc

Before taking Norvasc, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure or liver disease.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of Norvasc.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using Norvasc even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Norvasc is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Tell your doctor about all other heart or blood pressure medications you are taking.

Your chest pain may become worse when you first start taking Norvasc or when your dose is increased. Call your doctor if your chest pain is severe or ongoing.
Before taking Norvasc

You should not take Norvasc if you are allergic to amlodipine.

To make sure you can safely take Norvasc, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

*

  a heart valve problem called aortic stenosis;
*

  congestive heart failure; or
* liver disease.

If you are also taking a beta-blocker drug (such as Betapace, Blocadren, Corgard, Coreg, Inderal, InnoPran, Lopressor, Normodyne, Tenoretic, Tenormin, Toprol, Trandate, Zebeta, and others) do not suddenly stop using the beta-blocker without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. Stopping a beta-blocker too quickly can cause serious heart problems that will not be prevented by Norvasc.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Norvasc will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether amlodipine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking Norvasc.

See also: Norvasc pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Norvasc?

Take Norvasc exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Norvasc is usually taken once daily. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Your chest pain may become worse when you first start taking Norvasc or when your dose is increased. Call your doctor if your chest pain is severe or ongoing.

Norvasc is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using this medication even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store Norvasc at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include rapid heartbeats, severe dizziness, and fainting.
What should I avoid while taking Norvasc?

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of Norvasc.
Norvasc side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Norvasc: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

*

  feeling like you might pass out;
*

  swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;
*

  pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest; or
*

  chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling.

Less serious Norvasc side effects may include:

*

  headache;
*

  dizziness, drowsiness;
*

  tired feeling;
*

  stomach pain; or
*

  flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Norvasc side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Norvasc?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

*

  simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin); or
*

  any other heart or blood pressure medications.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Norvasc. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor

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What is Nolvadex (tamoxifen)?

Tamoxifen blocks the actions of estrogen, a female hormone. Certain types of breast cancer require estrogen to grow.

Tamoxifen is used to treat and prevent some types of breast cancer.

Tamoxifen may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Nolvadex (tamoxifen)?
Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant. It could cause harm to the unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

Before using tamoxifen, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver disease, high triglycerides (fatty acids) in your blood, a history of cataract, or a history of stroke or blood clot. Also tell your doctor if you if you are receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

If you are taking tamoxifen to reduce your risk of breast cancer, you may need to take your first dose while you are having a menstrual period. You may also need to have a pregnancy test before you start taking tamoxifen, to make sure you are not pregnant. Follow your doctor’s instructions.
Taking tamoxifen may increase your risk of uterine cancer, stroke, or a blood clot in the lung, which can be fatal. Talk with your doctor about your specific risks in taking this medication.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your doctor may want you to have mammograms and to perform routine breast self exams on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Nolvadex (tamoxifen)?
Do not use this medication if you are allergic to tamoxifen.

Before using tamoxifen, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

liver disease;

high levels of triglycerides (fatty acids) in your blood;

a history of stroke or blood clot;

a history of cataract; or

if you are receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

Taking tamoxifen may increase your risk of uterine cancer, stroke, or a blood clot in the lung, which can be fatal. Talk with your doctor about your specific risks in taking this medication. FDA pregnancy category D. This medication can cause harm to an unborn baby. Do not use tamoxifen without your doctor’s consent if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Use a non-hormonal form of birth control (such as a condom or a diaphragm and spermicide) while you are using this medication and for 2 months after your treatment ends. It is not known whether tamoxifen passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. This medication may also slow breast milk production. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Nolvadex (tamoxifen)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.
Take this medication with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

Tamoxifen can be taken with or without food.
If you are taking tamoxifen to reduce your risk of breast cancer, you may need to take your first dose while you are having a menstrual period. You may also need to have a pregnancy test before you start taking tamoxifen, to make sure you are not pregnant. Follow your doctor’s instructions.

It is important to use tamoxifen regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely. You may need to keep using this medication for up to 5 years.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your doctor may want you to have mammograms and to perform routine breast self exams on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.
Store tamoxifen at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?
Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of tamoxifen is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while taking Nolvadex (tamoxifen)?

Follow your doctor’s instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while you are using tamoxifen.

Nolvadex (tamoxifen) side effects
Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using tamoxifen and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;

chest pain, shortness of breath, or coughing up blood;

pain or swelling in one or both legs;

unusual vaginal bleeding or discharge;

irregular menstrual periods;

pain or pressure in your pelvic area;

fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;

pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding;

new breast lumps; or

nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

hot flashes, warmth or tingly feeling under your skin;

bone, joint, or tumor pain;

redness or skin changes;

swelling in your hands or feet;

vaginal itching or dryness;

depressed mood, weakness;

weight loss;

nausea;

cough, sore throat;

decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm;

headache, dizziness; or

thinning hair.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect.

See also: Nolvadex side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Nolvadex (tamoxifen)?

Many drugs can interact with tamoxifen. Below is just partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these medications:

aminoglutethimide (Cytadren);

bromocriptine (Parlodel);

cimetidine (Tagamet);

clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo);

isoniazid (for treating tuberculosis);

letrozole (Femara);

methimazole (Tapazole);

nicardipine (Cardene);

pioglitazone (Actos);

rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane);

ropinirole (Requip);

ticlopidine (Ticlid);

a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin);

anti-malaria medication such as chloroquine (Arelan) or pyrimethamine (Daraprim), or quinine (Qualaquin);

HIV or AIDS medicine such as delavirdine (Rescriptor) or ritonavir (Norvir);

an antibiotic such as terbinafine (Lamisil);

a heart rhythm medication such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) or quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G);

medicine to treat psychiatric disorders, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), or thioridazine (Mellaril); or

an antidepressant such as bupropion (Wellbutrin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), duloxetine (Cymbalta), fluoxetine (Prozac), imipramine (Tofranil), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or tranylcypromine (Parnate).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with tamoxifen. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

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What is Nizoral?

Nizoral (ketoconazole ) is an antifungal antibiotic.

Nizoral is used to treat infections caused by fungus, which can invade any part of the body including the mouth, throat, esophagus, lungs, bladder, or skin.

Nizoral may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Nizoral

You should not use Nizoral if you are allergic to ketoconazole, or if you are also taking triazolam (Halcion).

Before taking Nizoral, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, kidney disease, a heart rhythm disorder, decreased stomach acid (achlorhydria), or a history of “Long QT syndrome.”

Take Nizoral for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Nizoral will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Avoid taking antacids or stomach acid reducers (Tagamet, Pepcid, Axid, Zantac, and others) for at least 2 hours after you have taken your dose of Nizoral. These medications can make it harder for the Nizoral tablet to dissolve in your stomach.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may cause unpleasant side effects while you are taking Nizoral.
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Before taking Nizoral

You should not use Nizoral if you are allergic to ketoconazole, or if you are also taking triazolam (Halcion).

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take Nizoral:

*

  decreased stomach acid (achlorhydria);
*

  liver disease;
*

  kidney disease;
*

  a heart rhythm disorder; or
*

  a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome."

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Nizoral is harmful to an unborn baby. Before you take Nizoral, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Ketoconazole may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Nizoral without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

See also: Nizoral pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Nizoral?

Take Nizoral exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Nizoral works best if you take it with food. Take Nizoral for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Nizoral will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

To be sure Nizoral is not causing harmful effects, your liver function may need to be checked with blood tests on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Store Nizoral at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Nizoral dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Symptoms of a Nizoral overdose are not known.
What should I avoid while taking Nizoral?

Avoid taking antacids or stomach acid reducers (Tagamet, Pepcid, Axid, Zantac, and others) for at least 2 hours after you have taken your dose of Nizoral. These medications can make it harder for the Nizoral tablet to dissolve in your stomach.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It may cause unpleasant side effects while you are taking Nizoral.

See also: Nizoral and alcohol (in more detail)
Nizoral side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Nizoral: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

*

  dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeat;
*

  easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;
*

  numbness or tingly feeling;
*

  severe depression, confusion, or thoughts of hurting yourself; or
*

  nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, weakness, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious Nizoral side effects may include:

*

  mild nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain;
*

  mild itching or skin rash;
*

  headache;
*

  dizziness;
*

  breast swelling; or
*

  impotence or loss of interest in sex.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Nizoral side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Nizoral?

Many drugs can interact with Nizoral. Below is just a partial list. Tell your doctor if you are using:

*

  acetaminophen (Tylenol);
*

  cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sandimmune, Neoral);
*

  clopidogrel (Plavix);
*

  digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);
*

  tacrolimus ((Prograf);
*

  loratadine (Alavert, Claritin, Tavist ND);
*

  methylprednisolone (Medrol);
*

  phenytoin (Dilantin);
*

  rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane);
*

  diabetes medication you take by mouth;
*

  a sedative such as midazolam (Versed);
*

  a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);
*

  cancer medications;
*

  birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy;
*

  methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall);
*

  cholesterol medications such as niacin (Advicor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Altocor, Mevacor), simvastatin (Zocor), and others; or
*

  medications to treat HIV or AIDS.

This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Nizoral. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

How to buy nexium online cheaply!

What is Nexium?

Nexium (esomeprazole) belongs to a group of drugs called proton pump inhibitors. Nexium decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Nexium is used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Nexium is also used to promote healing of erosive esophagitis (damage to your esophagus caused by stomach acid).

Nexium may also be given to prevent gastric ulcer caused by infection with helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), or by the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Nexium is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Nexium may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Nexium

You should not take Nexium if you are allergic to esomeprazole or to any other benzimidazole medication such as albendazole (Albenza), or mebendazole (Vermox).

Before you take Nexium tell your doctor if you have severe liver disease or low levels of magnesium in your blood.

Nexium is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Some conditions are treated with a combination of Nexium and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Take Nexium for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the condition is fully treated.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.
Before taking Nexium

You should not take Nexium if you are allergic to esomeprazole or to any other benzimidazole medication such as albendazole (Albenza), or mebendazole (Vermox).

To make sure you can safely take Nexium, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

*

  severe liver disease; or
*

  low levels of magnesium in your blood.

Taking a proton pump inhibitor such as Nexium may increase your risk of bone fracture in the hip, wrist, or spine. This effect has occurred mostly in people who have taken the medication long term or at high doses, and in those who are age 50 and older. It is not clear whether Nexium is the actual cause of an increased risk of fracture. Before you take this medication, tell your doctor if you have osteoporosis or osteopenia (low bone mineral density).

Some conditions are treated with a combination of Nexium and antibiotics. Use all medications as directed by your doctor. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor’s advice.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

FDA pregnancy category B. Nexium is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment with Nexium. It is not known whether esomeprazole passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Nexium without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

See also: Nexium pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Nexium?

Take Nexium exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Nexium is usually given for 4 to 8 weeks only. Your doctor may recommend a second course of treatment if you need additional healing time.

Take each dose with a full glass (8 ounces) of water. Nexium should be taken at least one hour before a meal.

You may open the delayed-release capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of pudding or applesauce to make swallowing easier. Swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Discard the empty capsule.

Nexium can be given through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube. Open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a 60-milliliter syringe. Mix in 50 milliliters of water. Place the plunger into the syringe and shake the mixture well. Make sure there are no medicine granules stuck in the tip of the syringe. Attach the syringe to the NG tube and push the plunger down to empty the syringe into the tube. Then flush the tube with more water to wash the contents down.

Take Nexium for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the condition is fully treated. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking this medicine.

Nexium can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using Nexium.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

See also: Nexium dosage (in more detail)
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include confusion, headache, drowsiness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, nausea, dry mouth, sweating, flushing, shortness of breath, tremor, loss of coordination, or seizure (convulsions).
What should I avoid while taking Nexium?

This medication can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking Nexium and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Follow your doctor’s instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.
Nexium side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Nexium: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using Nexium and call your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms of low magnesium such as:

*

  dizziness, confusion;
*

  fast or uneven heart rate;
*

  jerking muscle movements;
*

  feeling jittery;
*

  diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
*

  muscle cramps, muscle weakness or limp feeling;
*

  cough or choking feeling; or
*

  seizure (convulsions).

Less serious Nexium side effects may include:

*

  headache, drowsiness;
*

  mild diarrhea;
*

  nausea, stomach pain, gas, constipation; or
*

  dry mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Nexium side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Nexium?

Nexium should not be taken together with atazanavir (Reyataz) or nelfinavir (Viracept). Tell your doctor if you are taking either of these medications to treat HIV or AIDS.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

*

  cilostazol (Pletal);
*

  citalopram (Celexa);
*

  clopidogrel (Plavix);
*

  dexamethasone (Cortastat, Dexasone, Solurex, DexPak);
*

  diazepam (Valium);
*

  digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);
*

  methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall);
*

  rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate);
*

  St. John's wort;
*

  tacrolimus (Prograf);
*

  voriconazole (Vfend); or
*

  HIV/AIDS medication such as etravirine (Intelence), rilpivirine (Complera, Edurant), or saquinavir (Invirase).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Nexium. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

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What is Neurontin?

Neurontin (gabapentin) is an anti-epileptic medication, also called an anticonvulsant. It affects chemicals and nerves in the body that are involved in the cause of seizures and some types of pain.

Neurontin is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat seizures caused by epilepsy in adults and children who are at least 12 years old. Neurontin is also used with other medications to treat partial seizures in children who are 3 to 12 years old.

Neurontin is also used in adults to treat nerve pain caused by herpes virus or shingles (herpes zoster).

Neurontin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
Important information about Neurontin

You should not use Neurontin if you are allergic to gabapentin.

Before taking Neurontin, tell your doctor if you have kidney, liver, or heart disease.

You may have thoughts about suicide while taking Neurontin. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.
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Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, depression, or if you feel agitated, hostile, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Do not stop taking Neurontin for seizures without first talking to your doctor, even if you feel fine. You may have increased seizures if you stop using Neurontin suddenly. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Contact your doctor if your seizures get worse or you have them more often while taking Neurontin.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take Neurontin. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you take seizure medication.
Before taking Neurontin

You should not use Neurontin if you are allergic to gabapentin.

To make sure you can safely take Neurontin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

*

  kidney disease;
*

  liver disease;
*

  heart disease; or
*

  (for patients with RLS) if you are a day sleeper or work a night shift.

You may have thoughts about suicide while taking Neurontin. Tell your doctor if you have new or worsening depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several months of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Your doctor will need to check you at regular visits. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Neurontin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. Gabapentin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use Neurontin without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

See also: Neurontin pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)
How should I take Neurontin?

Take Neurontin exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Neurontin can be taken with or without food.

If you break a tablet and take one half of it, take the other half at your next dose. Any tablet that has been broken should be used as soon as possible or within a few days.

Measure Neurontin liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Do not stop taking Neurontin for seizures without first talking to your doctor, even if you feel fine. You may have increased seizures if you stop using Neurontin suddenly. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Contact your doctor if your seizures get worse or you have them more often while taking Neurontin.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take Neurontin. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you take seizure medication.

Use this medicine regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Neurontin can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine.

Store Neurontin tablets at room temperature away from light and moisture. Store the liquid medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.
What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.
What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include blurred vision, drowsiness, weakness, slurred speech, or diarrhea.
What should I avoid while taking Neurontin?

Neurontin may cause blurred vision or impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

Avoid taking an antacid within 2 hours before or after you take Neurontin. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb Neurontin.
Neurontin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Neurontin: hives; fever; swollen glands; painful sores in or around your eyes or mouth; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, depression, or if you feel agitated, hostile, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

*

  increased seizures;
*

  fever, swollen glands, body aches, flu symptoms;
*

  skin rash, easy bruising or bleeding, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;
*

  upper stomach pain, loss of appetite, dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
*

  chest pain, irregular heart rhythm, feeling short of breath;
*

  confusion, nausea and vomiting, swelling, rapid weight gain, urinating less than usual or not at all;
*

  new or worsening cough, fever, trouble breathing; or
*

  rapid back and forth movement of your eyes.

Some side effects are more likely in children taking Neurontin. Contact your doctor if the child taking this medication has any of the following side effects:

*

  changes in behavior;
*

  memory problems;
*

  trouble concentrating; or
*

  acting restless, hostile, or aggressive.

Less serious Neurontin side effects may include:

*

  dizziness, drowsiness, weakness, tired feeling;
*

  nausea, diarrhea, constipation;
*

  blurred vision;
*

  headache;
*

  breast swelling;
*

  dry mouth; or
*

  loss of balance or coordination.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Neurontin side effects (in more detail)
What other drugs will affect Neurontin?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

*

  hydrocodone (Lortab, Vicodin, Vicoprofen, and others);
*

  morphine (Kadian, MS Contin, Oramorph, and others); or
*

  naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve, Anaprox, and others).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Neurontin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.